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ACCT (ACCT)


2110. Principles of Accounting I (3)

An introduction to financial accounting concepts emphasizing the analysis of business transactions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the effect of these transactions on the financial statements, financial analysis, and the interrelationships of the financial statements.

2120. Principles of Accounting II (3)

An introduction to the use of accounting information in the management decision making processes of planning, implementing, and controlling business activities. In addition, the course will discuss the accumulation and classification of costs as well as demonstrate the difference between costing systems. Prerequisite: 2110.


American Studies (AMST)


1110. Introduction to Environmental and Social Justice (3)

An introduction to the socially and politically constructed values directing Americans' attitudes toward nature, science and technology and to the impacts of those attitudes on built and natural environments regionally, nationally and globally. (ESJ) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1120. Introduction to Gender Studies (3)

While Gender Studies is truly a vast field of inquiry, there is great symmetry in the ways in which feminist scholars have been engaged with questions as to how disciplinary apparatuses and discourses shape and construct "gender." This course will begin with the process of peeking into this exciting scholarship, focusing on the "intersectional ties" of identity-that is, how gender has been produced in and through other categories of identity, such as race, class, sexuality, and nation. While there are numerous ways to structure such a course, this course will maneuver through the field of Gender Studies with an eye toward feminisms, race, and U.S. Empire through processes of incarceration, colonialism, and war). In this course, we will explore how the "intersectional ties" of identities have been constructed within a range of institutions, discourses, and processes, such as law, medicine, popular culture, nationalism, colonialism, and empire. Throughout, we will pay close attention to how discourses normalize certain types of identities, practices, and behaviors, and mark others as deviant or unnatural. And, of course, we will look for strategies to contest these productions. This will necessarily place us within key debates in feminist studies of power, agency, activism, and justice at the individual, community, national, and transnational levels, and allow us to end the course by interrogating the role of Gender Studies in regard to current U.S. occupation in the Middle East and Native America. This course will provide a strong foundation for you to pursue studies in feminist, queer, critical race, and postcolonial theories. (GS)

1130. Introduction to American Popular Culture (3)

This course considers a range of theoretical approaches to the study of popular culture, including cultural studies and feminist theory as well as key concepts and key debates in the study of popular culture. It explores the ways popular culture is implicated in the formation of social determinants such as ethnicity, race, gender, class, and sexuality and conversely, how these social determinants are implicated in the formation of popular culture. The course also considers the ways in which popular culture serves as a site of ongoing political struggle. The aim of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary to make sense of broader significance and relevance of popular culture--why popular culture matters. To accomplish this, we will investigate a number of popular expressive forms including magazines, fandom, digital music, and hip hop. (PC)

1140. Introduction to Race, Class and Ethnicity (3)

This course offers an introduction to the field of American Studies through an interdisciplinary examination of race, class and ethnicity in the United States and in a global context. Using a schedule of keywords, we will engage a range of central themes and concerns. We will examine histories of injustice, and resistance to injustice. Readings and assignments encourage students to notice the privilege and oppression at the core of U.S. society. The class will challenge the widely accepted assumption that we as a nation have moved beyond race and racism. Through readings, films, online sources, and our assignments, this course aims to increase our knowledge of inequality in our society, and the impact of those inequities on various societies and individuals. (RCE) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1150. Introduction to Southwest Studies (3)

This course introduces the complex histories, social issues, and cultural experiences of peoples of the southwestern United States. Course materials and discussions also demonstrate the possibilities of interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. We will examine cross- cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion; social and political economy. (SS) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. American Life and Thought (3)

This course introduces students to cultural studies and the alternative interpretations of American history and culture. Particular attention will be paid to indigenous history, country music, tattoos, and American mobilization for war. Course materials and lectures will frequently utilize cultural traditions to explore key concepts and issues. Additionally, this course will require students to assume an analytical and critical perspective on academic interpretive models. We will read texts that exemplify critical Marxist, feminist, and reflexive anthropological approaches.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ)


Anthropology (ANTH)


1115. Introduction to Anthropology (3)

Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1135 [1175]. Introduction to Biological Anthropology [Evolution and Human Emergence] (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity. Biological Anthropology concentration students are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 1135L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1135L [1175L]. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory [Evolution and Human Emergence Laboratory] (1)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1135. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1140. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization,supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1155. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)

This is an introductory course which provides an overview of the discipline of Linguistic Anthropology. The course will discuss the implications of language within anthropology, as well as within the sciences and social sciences more generally. The course explores the core concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, such as the basic structure of language, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and social and regional variations that are used to help students understand what it means to be human and the role of language in human societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1170. Human Life [Human Life Course] (3)

Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1170L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1170L. Computer Laboratory in Human Evolutionary Ecology (1)

Introduces the computer as a tool in biological and social science research, provides first-hand experience in data collection, analysis and modeling behavior. No prior computer experience required. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1170.

1211. Archaeological Method and Theory (3)

This class explores different ways of studying and interpreting the past through a survey of archaeology's historical, theoretical, and methodological development. If you are interested in archaeology as a career (or even just trying out an archaeological field school), this course is critical: it will provide you with the basic tools for conducting archaeological research and with an understanding of the background of the discipline. For this reason, this course is required for Anthropology majors with an Archaeology concentration. Even if you know you don't want to be an archaeologist, though, this class may interest you. Have you ever wondered how archaeologists know what they know about the? Are you skeptical about some archaeological claims? Have you ever read a statement about the past and thought, "is this really true?" This class will provide you with the skills, both conceptual and practical, to answer those questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Corequisite: 1211L.

1211L. Archaeological Method and Theory Laboratory (1)

Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Corequisite: 1211.

1996. Topics [Topics in Current Anthropology] (1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ])

2175. World Archaeology (3)

Archaeology is the systematic study of the human past through material remains. This course introduces students to the physical remains of past societies and compares and contrasts archaeological development in different regions. Students will explore the dynamics of the human past and its influences on contemporary society. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2190C. Forensic Anthropology (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the forensic investigation of death. Emphasis will be on current methods and techniques and include the role of the anthropologist as an integral member of the investigation process.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Arabic (ARBC)


1130. Arabic I Intensive (6)

Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Novice High to Intermediate Low level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2130. Arabic II Intensive (6)

Continuation of 1130. Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Intermediate level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2140. Intermediate Arabic I Intensive (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate Mid level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2150. Intermediate Arabic II Intensive (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate High level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.


Arquitecture (ARCH)


1115 [111]. Introduction to Architectural Graphics (3)

Introduction to manual and digital drawing as well as modeling techniques for architectural and interior design. Students will learn how to represent composition, form and space by orthographic drawing, paraline and perspective views, and freehand sketching. Three-dimensional model building techniques will also be introduced.

1120. Introduction to Architecture (3)

This course provides students the tools and vocabulary to analyze, interpret and discuss the built environment from the social, historical, perceptual and technical determinants. Students are introduced to elements, principles, and theories of architecture through their social, historical, and technical determinants. The course seeks to lay a foundation in architectural studies, including introducing students to fundamental vocabulary and concepts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.


Art History (ARTH)


1120. Introduction to Art (3)

In this class, students will be introduced to the nature, vocabulary, media and history of the visual arts, illustrated by examples drawn from many cultures, both Western and non-Western and across many centuries. We will begin with a general overview of the subject, including basic concepts and themes that shed light on the continuity of the artistic enterprise across the span of human experience. We will study the visual elements from which art is made, including how artists use these elements and how the artists' use of visual elements affects our experience of looking at art. We will examine both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, camera and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture, installation, crafts and architecture. Selected works will be examined in context, including the history of the time and place in which they were created, as well as their function, patronage, and the character and intent of individual artists. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. History of Art I (3)

This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

2120. History of Art II (3)

This survey course will explore the architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and glass objects from the 14th century to the modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

2130. Modern Art (3)

This course is an overview of European and American art and architecture during the Modern era. Students will analyze the various movements in art as they relate to the historical settings in which the works were created. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual and cultural movements as they affected and were affected by their creation and development.

2245. History of Photography (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the major trends in the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of photography from its beginnings in the 1830's to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies. Together we will investigate photography's role as an artistic medium as a central focus, as well as its broader role in our visual, political, and social culture. Textbook readings, online lectures, discussions boards, exams, and other activities will assist students in gaining a critical understanding of photography. {Offered upon demand}

250. Modern Art. (3)

Major stylistic developments of European and American painting and sculpture from Impressionism to approximately World War II. (Main Campus Courses)


Art Studio (ARTS)


1220. Art Practices I (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design.

1230. Art Practices II (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE while developing concepts, techniques, and processes involved in working in the third dimension. Prerequisite: 1220.

1310. Introduction to Ceramics (3)

This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include handbuilding and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing.

1320. Ceramics I (3)

An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. Prerequisite: 1310.

141. Introduction to Art and Ecology (3)

This course introduces the student to three basic skills of an ecological art practice: research, making, and an immersion in ecological systems through poetic thinking, subversive action, and creative fabrication.

1410. Introduction to Photography (3)

This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality,composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively. The historical aspects of photography are also covered.

1510. Introduction to Electronic Arts (3)

This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the Internet to create artwork.

1610. Drawing I (3)

This course introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space and composition.

1630. Painting I (3)

This course introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition. Prerequisite: 1610.

1710. Introduction to Printmaking (3)

This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. Prerequisite: 1610.

1810. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course introduces the basic techniques, materials, and tools traditionally used in the creation of jewelry and/or small-scale sculptural objects.

1830. Shop Foundation (2)

This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

1840. Sculpture I (3)

This course introduces the student to a variety of medium and techniques used in the production of sculpture; along with the historic, conceptual, and esthetic foundations of the sculptural process. Prerequisite: 1830.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2610. Drawing II (3)

This course introduces color and colored media as an element of composition while emphasizing descriptive and perceptual drawing skills and conceptual approaches to contemporary drawing. Prerequisite: 1610.

2630. Painting II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. Prerequisite: 1630.

2810. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fabrication skills are further developed and refined while additional advanced fabrication methods are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding of form and content as it relates to creating on an intimate scale. Prerequisite: 1810.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Astronomy (ASTR)


1115. Introduction to Astronomy (3)

This course surveys observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. The course is predominantly for non-science majors, aiming to provide a conceptual understanding of the universe and the basic physics that governs it. Due to the broad coverage of this course, the specific topics and concepts treated may vary. Commonly presented subjects include the general movements of the sky and history of astronomy, followed by an introduction to basic physics concepts like Newton's and Kepler's laws of motion. The course may also provide modern details and facts about celestial bodies in our solar system, as well as differentiation between them: Terrestrial and Jovian planets, exoplanets, the practical meaning of "dwarf planets", asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. Beyond this we may study stars and galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, black holes, clusters of galaxies and dark matter. Finally, we may study cosmology, the structure and history of the universe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1115L. Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory (1)

Includes hands-on exercises that work to reinforce concepts covered in the lecture, and may include additional components that introduce students to the night sky. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1115.

1996. Topics [Selected Topics] (1-6, no limit ? [3, may be repeated three times)

Prerequisite: 1115. {Offered upon demand}

2110. General Astronomy I (3)

An introductory course covering the basics of the night sky, relevant physics, and the Solar System. The level of math is trigonometry and pre- calculus. First of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 1230 or PHYS 1310.

2110L. General Astronomy I Laboratory (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with 2110. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2110.

2115. General Astronomy II (3)

An introductory course covering the Sun, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Second of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250. Pre- or corequisite: Any physics course numbered 1200 or higher.

2115L. General Astronomy II Laboratory (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with 2115. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2115.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Automotive Technology (AUTT)


111. Automotive Testing and Diagnosis (6)

Intended to give the student a background in testing and diagnosis of electronic, electrical and fuel systems found in current automobiles.

115. Brake Systems (6)

The study of modern brake theory including drum and disc-type brakes. Mechanical and hydraulic principles as they pertain to brakes will be covered.

130. Electrical System Repair (6)

Electrical theory and diagnosis. Starting, charging, lighting and related electrical systems in automotive application will be studied.

157. Steering and Suspension (6)

A detailed study of steering and suspension components and their repair and alignment. Prerequisite: 150* or equivalent.

167. Emission Control Service (3)

To familiarize the student with the various emission control devices including functions, diagnosis, repair, and/or service.

170. Heating and Air Condition (6)

Covers the basic and advanced instruction of the latest heating and air-conditioning systems, also the testing, diagnosis and repair of A/C compressors and components.

203. Automotive Engine Overhaul (6)

To teach students the repair and overhaul procedure performed on a gas engine.

210. Drive Train Overhaul (6)

Repair and overhaul of drive train components such as clutch, manual transmission, transfer case and differentials found on 2-wheel, 4- wheel and front wheel drive vehicles.

213. Automatic Transmission Overhaul (6)

A detailed study of the overhaul procedures on all current domestic automatic transmissions.

230. Electrical System Overhaul (3)

To review basic electrical theory and learn the testing and overhaul procedures for electrical system components.

293. Automotive Technology Topics (1-6)

A heading for special course offerings, seminars and workshops in various areas of automotive technology. The special offerings will be taught by regular faculty and will focus on topics of special concern on an as-needed basis.

295. Practicum in Auto Technology (3 to a maximum of 9)

The student will work on the Gallup Campus in an assignment involving a variety of tasks equivalent to the functions and responsibilities of the line mechanic or parts counter person.

299. Co-op Education in Automotive Technology (3-6)

The student will work in a garage or training facility in the Gallup area and at the same time will be attending the college during part of the day. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hr.


Business Computer and Information Systems (BCIS)


1110. Fundamentals of Information Literacy and Systems [Introduction to Information Systems] (3)

Examination of information systems and their impact on commerce, education, and personal activities. Utilization of productivity tools for communications, data analysis, information management and decision- making. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1215 or (MATH 1215X and MATH 1215Y and MATH 1215Z) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522.


Biology (BIOL)


110. Biology Non-Majors (3)

Biological principles important for the non-major in today's world. Ecological, evolutionary and molecular topics. Three lectures. (Credit not allowed for both 110 and 123/124L.) Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Fall, Spring. (Main Campus Course)

1110. General Biology (3)

This course introduces non-science majors to basic biological concepts including, but not limited to, the properties of life, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Three lectures. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1110L. General Biology Laboratory (1)

This laboratory course for non-science majors compliments the concepts covered in the associated general biology lecture course. Students will learn quantitative skills involved in scientific measurement and data analysis. Students will also perform experiments related to topics such as biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomic classification and phylogeny, biodiversity, and ecology. One 3- hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1110.

1140. Biology for Health Sciences (3)

This introductory biology course for students interested in health science careers focuses on the concepts of chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, and regulation of gene expression. Not accepted toward the Biology major. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1140L. Biology for Health Sciences Laboratory (1)

This course is a laboratory that complements the concepts learned in the theory course. Students will learn skills involved in scientific measurement, microscopy, and mathematical analysis. Students will also perform experiments and data analysis related to cell structure and function, chemistry, enzyme activity, and genetics. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1140.

1150 [191]. Biodiversity (2)

Biodiversity is the variety of life on earth. There are 2-10 million species on earth, but this number surely is vastly underestimated. Moreover, 99% of all species that ever existed are extinct. This course provides a broad survey of biodiversity-past, present, and future-with an emphasis on major groups in the tree of life (e.g., insects, plants, vertebrates, fungi, bacteria, etc.) and how humans interact with earth's biodiversity. We will explore biodiversity as it relates to earth history, mass extinctions, conservation, economics, ecology, evolution, and human society. We will also explore ways in which we categorize biodiversity (taxonomy and systematics) and catalog it for study (museums).

124L. Biology for Health Related Sciences and Non-Majors Lab (1)

One credit optional laboratory to accompany 123. Pre- or co-requisite: 123. Fall, Spring. (Main Campus Course)

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110C. Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Lecture and Laboratory (4)

This course introduces students to major topics in general biology. This courses focuses on the principles of structure and function of living things at the molecular, cellular and organismic levels of organization. Major topics included are introduction to the scientific process, chemistry of cells, organization of cells, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Three lectures, one discussion section. Students who completed AP Chemistry in high school should see the instructor of record or a Biology department advisor. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217) and CHEM 1215L.

2210. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for Biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Three lectures. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215).

2210L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1)

This is the first in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Pre- or corequisite: 2210.

2225. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3)

This course is the second of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on specific cellular, tissue, and organ structure and physiology, and organ system structure and function; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Additionally, an analysis of these concepts is included: fluid and electrolyte balance, pregnancy, growth and development from zygote to newborn, and heredity. Three lectures. Prerequisite: 2210.

2225L. Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1)

This is the second in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2225.

2305. Microbiology for Health Sciences (4)

This course introduces the basic principles of microbial structure, genetics, and physiology, virology, parasitology, disease, pathogenicity, epidemiology and immunology. Only some emphasis is given to basic biological principles. The course is designed for those obtaining a career in the health sciences. Not accepted toward the Biology major or minor. Credit for both this course and BIOL **351/**352L may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or (CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L)).

2410C. Principles of Biology: Genetics Lecture and Laboratory (4)

Mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and inheritance, molecular basis of inheritance, genes to proteins, genetic models (viruses and bacteria), eukaryotic genomes, genetic basis of development and overview of genomes. Three lectures, 1 discussion section. Prerequisite: 2110C and ((CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217) and CHEM 1215L). Pre- or corequisite: (CHEM 1225 or CHEM 1227) and CHEM 1225L).

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Business-Technology (BSTC)


293. Topics (1 - 3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Courses on a variety of subjects offered by need and interest. Different section numbers indicate different topics.


Business Administration (BUSA)


1110. Introduction to Business (3)

Fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate.

1996. Special Topics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Culinary Arts (CART)


108. SERVSAFE ()

109. Table Service Intern (3)

110. Cul Arts Internship (3)

293. T: Advanced Baking Basics (3)


Chemistry (CHEM)


1105. Preparation for College Chemistry (2)

A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared, or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for CHEM 1215/1215L. A grade of "CR" can be used as placement into CHEM 1215/1215L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

1106. Foundations of Chemistry (3)

A unique preparatory course for CHEM 1215 and your subsequent chemistry courses. It has a dual purpose; firstly, to help you obtain a solid foundation in the chemical concepts that are essential to your future chemistry and science classes, and secondly to optimize your set of learning skills to help you learn more efficiently, demonstrate your knowledge and succeed in your future fast-paced high-level science courses.

1110C [1110]. Chemistry in Our Community Lecture and Laboratory [Chemistry in Our Community] (4 [3])

This course will introduce non-science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand topics of current interest affecting their communities, such as air and water quality, global climate change, use of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. Experiments will illustrate chemical principles and acquaint students with scientific methods, data processing, critical thinking and scientific writing.

1120C. Introduction to Chemistry for Non-Majors Lecture and Laboratory (4)

This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Three lectures, 3 hours demo lab/recitation. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1215 may not be applied toward a degree program.Credit for both this course and CHEM 1217 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1215Z or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540.

1215. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors (3)

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to general chemistry for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional programs. Students will be introduced to several fundamental concepts, including mole, concentration, heat, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, bonding, physical states, stoichiometry, and reactions. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: ((1105 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540) and ALEKS1 =>50%) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L.

1215L. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors Laboratory (1)

The first-semester laboratory course designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Prerequisite: ((1105 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540) and ALEKS1 =>50%) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215 or 1217.

1217 [131]. Principles of Chemistry I [Principles of Chemistry] (3)

As the first of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity, nature of chemical bonds, molecular structure, the three phases of matter, etc. In addition, the application of these concepts to various chemical sub-disciplines, such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, and materials chemistry. Designed for majors in chemical sciences and engineering, it is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>660. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L.

1225. General Chemistry II for STEM Majors (3)

This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre- professional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1227 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: ((1215 or 1217) and 1215L) or ALEKS2 =>50%. Pre- or corequisite: 1225L.


Chinese (CHIN)


101. First Year Chinese I (3)


Communication and Journalism (CJ)


130. Public Speaking (3)

A performance course that deals with the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. (Main Campus Course)

221. Interpersonal Communication (3)

Analysis of a variety of interpersonal communication concepts with special emphasis on the application of communication skills in different situations. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. (Main Campus Course)

262. Radio/Television Performance (3)

Verbal and non-verbal performance and message preparation skills related to both the audio and video components of the mass media. Emphasis on fundamentals of prepared, extemporaneous and interpretiv e speaking for radio and television. Offered every odd year in the spring. (Main Campus Course)


Cert Nursing Asst (CNA)


101. Nursing Assistant (8)

Covers the physical, emotional, psychosocial and spiritual care given by nursing assistants to Long Term Care Residents, Hospital Patients and Home Care Clients.


Construction Technology (CNST)


101. Layout and Framing (4)

A study of wood form construction techniques which include methods of wall, roof and deck framing. Planning the layout of structural members is emphasized. Stress and strain on these structural members is studied in conjunction with the structural capacities of various types of wood and other materials. These courses consist of lab and classroom experiences. Fall.

103. Exterior Finishing (4)

A study of exterior trim techniques; selection of doors and windows; method of installing doors and windows. Includes paint, stain, and prefabrication materials. Taught through lab and classroom experiences. Fall.

104. Core Curriculum (4)

Required introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for certification. Topics studied include basic math, communications, prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

105. Interior Finishing (4)

A study of the interior of a building which includes methods of wall, ceiling, and floor finishing. The use of different types of covering, paint, paneling, and texture, will be emphasized. The installation of decorative tile for bathroom, kitchen, and floors will be explored. Spring.

106. Cabinet Building (4)

A study of cabinet making. Students will have the opportunity to make kitchen, bathroom and special cabinets. Includes construction methods of cabinet making as well as various finishing techniques. Counter top materials, such as Formica, will be examined. Taught through classroom and lab experience. Fall.

109. Plumbing Theory I (3)

Covers occupational introductions, human relations, safety, tools and equipment used in plumbers trade, plumbing components, sizes of various residential and commercial plumbing systems, pipe fitt ings, pipe joining and cost estimation. Fall.

115. Concrete Pouring and Finishing (4)

A study of the use of concrete in building construction. The use of power tools and hand tools to finish walls and work will be demonstrated. Spring.

121. Electrical Wiring (4)

A study of wiring procedures including electrical service entrances, switching circuits, fuse and circuit breakers, and ground fault interrupter circuits.

124. Sustainable Energy (4)

Introductory level course study of sustainable alternative energy systems. The focus of the Photovoltaic course is theory, technology, and preparation for certification of students to do commercial installations.

140. Central Heating Systems (4)

A study of the design and installation of heating systems as well as material of calculating the heat loss structures. It will include hydronic, forced air and electrical heating systems. A section of this course examines modern insulating materials and their use in reducing the cost of heating. Taught through classroom and lab experiences. Fall.

174. Green Building/Design (4)

The course is designed to explore and educate students in sustainable building technology. Students will study past, current practices, and future best practices for green design and building. Prerequisite: CNST 104.

208. Furniture Construction (4)

The design and construction of various types and styles of furniture including functional analysis thereof. Fall, Summer.

220. Residential Electrical Code (3)

A preparatory course to apply for the New Mexico Residential Electrical Contractors license. No assurance of actual issuance of a license is given with this course. Spring.


Comparative Literature (COMP)


222. Fairy and Folk Tales (3)

An exploration of fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures. The course introduces methods of analysis while exploring historical and contemporary roles and interrelationships of the tales. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)


Cosmetology (COSM)


110. Theory of Cosmetology I (3)

Theoretical training in hygiene, bacteriology, sterilization, sanitation, rules and regulations of State Board and related practical areas.

111. Theory of Cosmetology II (3)

Theoretical training in finger weaving, wigs, chemicals, hot work, skin and hair disorders. State Board rules and regulations and relative practical areas.

120. Manicuring I (2)

Introduction and application on practice hands and patrons. Massage, sanitation, sterilization, State Board rules and regulations.

121. Manicuring II (2)

Introduction to nails, tips, and wraps. Application on practice hands and patrons.

130. Permanent Wave, Shampooing and Styling (3)

Introduction and practical application on mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

131. Permanent Wave, Shampooing & Styling II (4)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology. Prerequisite: 130*.

140. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials I (4)

Introduction and practical application on mannequins. Covering all areas of Cosmetology.

141. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials II (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

212. Theory of Cosmetology III (3)

Theoretical training in anatomy, electricity, chemistry, hygiene and good grooming, visual poise and salon management. Final State Board Exam.

220. Stropping/Honing/Shaving (2)

This course includes the care and styling of scalp and facial hair. It will provide a basic understanding of Barbering and its history. Emphasis is placed on proper use of instruments, personal hygiene, sanitation, recognition of common disorders/diseases and State Board rules and regulations affecting the cosmetologists performing services on clients. This subject is taught by lectures, visual aids, demonstrations, conferences and assigned projects. 50 contact hr.

232. Permanent Wave, Shampooing and Styling III (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology. Prerequisite: 131*.

242. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

250. Cosmetology Lab I (1-3)

Practical application on mannequins. Review of all areas of Cosmetology.

251. Cosmetology Lab II (1-3)

Practical application on patrons. Review and final State Board Exam in all areas of Cosmetology.

252. Cosmetology Lab III (3)

Practical application of Cosmetology theory. Students will work with clients in a clinic setting and will complete the number of clock hr. required by the State Board of Cosmetology to be eligible to take the State License Exam.

260. Salon Management (2)

Practical training in Business Management, salesmanship, bookkeeping, inventory control and professional attitudes and development.

291. Independent Study (3 - 9)

Designed for students to study research, selected topics, issues and/or problems in Cosmetology. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator. Fall, Spring.

293. Cosmetology Topics (1 - 6)

Special course offerings, semesters, workshops in various areas of Cosmetology as needed. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator. Fall, Spring.


Criminal Justice (CRJS)


108. Defense Tactics (2)

Instruction on techniques used in controlling compliant and non-complaint suspects, weapon recovery, arrest techniques, control tactics, including defense from intermediate weapons. Includes classroom instruction and hands-on activities.

111. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

Criminal Justice

112. Administration of Justice (3)

Discern the fundamental characteristics and issues that make criminal justice different from criminology. Discuss base criminological theories and how they differ.

132. Introduction to Criminology (3)

An interdisciplinary study of the major types of criminal behavior: factors which contribute to the production of criminally and delinquency, methods used in dealing with violators, definition of crime, crime statistics, theories of crime causation, crime typologies; social consequences of crime.

171. Forensic Science (3)

The course provides the non-science major with an introduction to forensic science. The course creates a basis for understanding many of the concepts and techniques on which forensic science is built, such as those associated with crime scene processing, physical evidence, microscopy, fingerprints, firearms, DNA.

201. Criminal Law I (3)

Historical development and philosophy of law: definitions, components of the system. Primary emphasis in law enforcement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

210. Criminal Justice and Community Relations (3)

This course is a study of the importance of two-way communication between the criminal justice system and the community to foster a working relationship between the community and the law enforcement element to control crime. A variety of topics are studied, including citizen involvement in crime prevention, police officer interpersonal relations, and communications between the community and the law enforcement agency.Prerequisites: CRJS 111, 112, 132 and 222

221. Criminal Investigation (3)

Study of the criminal investigation process which includes crime scene management, evidentiary concerns, sources of information, and interview concepts. Spring.

222. Constitutional Criminal Procedures (3)

This course is an in-depth analysis of criminal evidence rules in the United States. Topics include trial procedures, examination of witness, real/physical evidence, circumstantial evidence, hearsay evidence and exceptions, privileged communications, declarations against interest, and judicial notice.

231. Controlled Substance (3)

Use and abuse of drugs; nature, therapeutic action, toxicology, chemical and physical identification of select drugs; scientific, official, trade and slang terminology; legal aspects and classification. Upon demand.

233. Traffic Control and Accident Investigation (3)

This course will prepare students to identify traffic safety concerns, identify common traffic laws and how to enforce them. It prepares student on accident scene investigations as well.

235. Police Procedures and Police Tactics (3)

The course prepares students on methods of engagement with the public on various contact incidents in police work including crime scenes, accidents, domestic violence, hazardous chemical spills and first line responder.

292. Criminal Justice Internship (3)

Planned program of observation and practical experience in selected criminal justice agencies representing the major classification corpus delicti and punishment of various criminal acts; legal research and case study. Fall, Spring, Summer.

293. Topics In Criminal Justice (1 - 6 )

A heading for a forum of special course offering, seminars and workshops in various areas of criminal justice. Upon demand.


Community and Regional Planning (CRP)


165. Community and Regional Planning, Introduction (3)

Introduction to the social, economic, political and physical factors involved in the development of cities and towns. Emphasis on the nature of urban form as a reflection of the prevailing past and present political economy of society.(Main Campus)


Collision Repair Technology (CRT)


106. Restoring Corrosion Protection (4)

Define corrosion and describe the common factors involved in using various materials to protect steel body parts from rusting.

107. Auto Glass/Restraint Systems (4)

Auto glass replacement and restraint systems, restraint system repairs, windshield, door glass, back glass, replacement, operation of air bag system, operation of seat belt, and child safety seat.

115. Advanced Painting (4)

Identify and explain the differences between the two major types of plastic used in automobiles. Identify unknown plastics. Repair minor cuts and cracks in plastics by means of a chemical bonding process. Explain the keys to good plastics welding. Explain the safety precautions used when working with fiberglass.

122. Straight Mea Sys-Non-Str (4)

Measuring principles and techniques is the study of modern measuring concepts and use of ref erence manual.

124. Straight Mea Sys-Struct (4)

Detailed study of anchoring, pulling equipment, pulling concepts, and stress relieving in body repair.

210. Custom Painting (4)

Modern graphics, frames, design, and pin-striping. New paint systems and spray equipment.


Computer Science (CS)


150L. Computing for Business Students (3)

Prerequisite: Math 120. Students will use personal computers in campus laboratories to learn use of a word processor, a spreadsheet, and a database management system. The course will also cover access to the World Wide Web and other topics of current importance to business students. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science. (Main Campus Course)

151L. Computer Program Fundamentals for Non-Majors and Basic Knowledge Gain (3)

Prerequisite: Math 150. An introduction to the art of computing. Not intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving. (Main Campus Course)


Design and Digital Media (DDM)


110. Introduction to Graphic Design (3)

An introductory level course designed to familiarize students with the principles governing good design as it applies to visual communication. Students are acquainted with the history and evolution of graphic design, as well as the terminology and processes necessary to produce printed material in a computer-based design studio environment.

111. Digital Image Editing I (3)

151. Multimedia Authoring I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101 Pre- or Co-requisite: 110. Examines the concepts and methods used in the development of this new form of communication. Topics include project design, interactive programming, and the effective use of color images, animation, video and sound.

212. Digital Image Editing II (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 111 or permission of instructor. This course builds on the skills developed in DDM 111. Topics include scanning, masking and selection techniques, formatting files for export to page layout programs, object layering, and the retouching of photographic images.

245. 3-D Illustration (3)

Prerequisite: DDM 101*, 110*, 111* or permission of instructor. An advanced examination of the principles and techniques of 3-D computer illustration. Topics include rendering of bitmapped and Postscript artwork, lathing, extruding, texture mapping and the creation of animated sequences for use in multimedia presentations.

260. Digital Video I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101*, 110*, 111 *, 151* or permission of instructor. Introduces students to digital video communication, including video capture, editing, and playback of digital movies. Hands-on experience with Adobe Premiere software, and discussion of the role of this new medium.


Drafting Technology (DRFT)


101. Mechanical Drafting I (3)

Lettering Techniques of mechanical drafting, drafting constructions, shape descriptions. Orthographic projection drawings, geometry, sketching, and sectional views.

115. AutoCAD Level I (3)

Students build CAD skills, create production drawings, and develop a CAD library of symbols. Prerequisite: DRFT 105 or instructor approval.


Early Childhood Multicult Ed (ECME)


101. Child Growth, Development, and Learning (3)

This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, pre-birth through age eight, provides students with the foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals and with knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all aspects of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognition, and language domains. The adult's role in supporting each child's growth, development and learning will be emphasized.

103. Health, Safety, and Nutrition (2)

This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children's physical and mental well-being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe earning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for the prevention of childhood illnesses and communicable diseases. The course examines the many nutritional factors that are important for children's total development, healthy eating habits, physical activity, and rest. Students gain knowledge necessary for creating safe learning environments for decreasing risk and preventing childhood injury.

111. Family and Community Collaboration (3)

This course examines the involvement of families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with parents and others involved with children in early childhood settings are discussed. Strategies for communicating with parents and guardians about their children and incorporating the families' goals and desires for their children into the early childhood program will be included.

115. Guiding of Young Child (3)

This class explores various theories of child guidance and the practical application of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Appropriate strategies for preventing and dealing with violence, aggression, anger, and stress will be explored. Emphasis is placed on helping children become self-responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners.

117. Curriculum Development through Play - Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K) (3)

The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for child birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways.

117L. Practicum for Curriculum Development through Play - Birth through Age 4 (Pre-K) (3)

The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite to Curriculum Development through Play - Birth through Age 4. The field based component course provides experiences that address curriculum content relevant for children.

202. Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development (3)

This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children's emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children's phonemic awareness, literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and language development. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. An integrated language arts perspective and an interdisciplinary approach as it addresses developing writing, reading, and oral language in the home and school contexts will be addressed.

217. Curriculum Development and Implementation - Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 (3)

The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills, is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included.

217L. Curriculum Development and Implementation - Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. (2)

The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development and Implementation - Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3. The field based component of this course will provide experience that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content.

220. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs I (3)

This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative program evaluation to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

230. Professionalism (2)

This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.


Economics (ECON)


105. Introductory Macroeconomics (3)

Economics on a national scale: determination of national income, employment level, inflation, and impact of policies affecting money supply, interest rates and government programs. Current macroeconomic issues and problems.

106. Introductory Microeconomics (3)

Exploration of individual consumer behavior, production decisions by the firm, and supply and demand relationships in the marketplace. Examination of the international dimension of production and consumption choices. Prerequisites for UNMG students: READ100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. Prerequisite for most upper upper-division courses. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. (Main Campus Course)


Education (EDUC)


293. Topics in Education (1-3)

Various topics related to education from an interdisciplinary perspective.


Emergency Medical Services (EMS)


106. Emergency Medical Responder (4)

Emergency Medical Responder is a 60-hours course designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for advanced EMS courses.

113. EMT-Basic (8)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lecture instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Co-requisite: 142. Restriction: Instructor permission.

120. Introduction to EMS System (3)

Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS.

142. EMT-Basic Lab (2)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Corequisite: 113. Restriction: program permission.

143. EMT-Intermediate Lab (1)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology.Prerequisite: 113 and 142.Corequisite: 180.Restriction: program permission.(Main Campus Course)

151. EMT-I Clinical and Field Experience (2)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and prehospital experience. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Co-requisite: 143 and 180. Restriction: program permission.

180. EMT-Intermediate (5)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate lecture content, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 143.Restriction: program permission. (Main Campus Course)


English (ENGL)


100. Writing Standard English (3)

Developmental writing course providing concentrated practice writing and revising essays, as well as intensive study of grammar, punctuation, and usage; and includes a skills laboratory. G rade option: RA, RB, RCR/RNC.
Prerequisite/placement: Successful completion of ENGL 099 or minimum writing COMPASS score of 57, or verbal ACT score of 17.

110. Accelerated Composition (3)

Covers Composition I and II in one semester, focusing on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. Credit not allowed for both ENGL 110 and ENGL 112 or for both ENGL 110 and 113. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications (NMCCN 1113). (EPW)
Prerequisite: ACT English =15-25 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =430-650 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills =>109-120.

111-112. Composition I and II (3,3)

irst and second semester of Composition I and II sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies.

113. Enhanced Composition (3)

Covers Composition I and II in one semester with a 1 credit hour lab. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. Credit not allowed for both 113 and 110, or for both 113 and 112. (EPW)

119. Technical Communications (3)

Introductory study of written and verbal communications used in the technical professions with emphasis in the planning, execution, and editing of professional and technical documents and other communication media. Prerequisite: ENGL 111.

120. Composition III (3)

Focuses on academic writing, research, and argumentation using appropriate genres and technologies. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications (NMCCN 1123). (EPW)
Prerequisite: 110 or 112 or 113 or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.

150. The Study of Literature (3)

An introduction to the study and appreciation of literature for non-English majors. Shows how understanding writers' techniques increases the enjoyment of their works; relates these techniques to literary conventions; teaches recognition, analysis, discussion of important themes. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 2213). (LL)

219. Technical and Professional Writing (3)

Practice in writing and editing of workplace documents, including correspondence, reports and proposals. (EPW)
Prerequisite: 120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

220. Expository Writing (3 to a maximum of 6)

An intermediate course with emphasis on rhetorical types, structure and style. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications (EPW).
Prerequisite: 120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

224. Introduction to Creative Writing (3)

A beginning course in the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Emphasis on process over product. Introduces issues of craft, workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and the habit of reading as a writer. (CW) Prerequisite: 110 or 112 or 113. (Main Campus Course)

264. Survey of Native Literatures and Rhetorics (3)

A general overview of the history and diversity of the literatures and rhetorics of Native peoples, including oral tradition, film, autobiography, fiction, poetry, art, drama and ceremony. Focus is on American Indian texts. (LL)


Environmental Science (ENVS)


101. The Blue Planet (3)

To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth's lithosphere, atmosphere and oceans and how ecosystems are linked to the physical environment. Students are encouraged but not required to enroll concurrently in 102L. (Main Campus Course)

102L. The Blue Planet Laboratory (1)

Introductory environmental earth science laboratory. Includes minerals, rocks and rock cycle, topographic maps, local geology and groundwater, weather and climate. Pre-or co-requisite: 101 (Main Campus Course)


Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS)


101. How the Earth Works - An Introduction to Geology (3)

A fascinating tour of our active planet. Explore earth materials (rocks and minerals), the continents' motions and related origins of earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, oceans, landscapes, natural energy and economic resources, global warming and other topics. Students are encouraged but not required to enroll concurrently in 105L. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science (NMCCN 1114).

105L. Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

Minerals, rocks and topographic and geologic maps; field trips. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science (NMCCN 1114). Pre- or corequisite: 101. Fall, Spring


Fire Science (FISC)


105. Fire & Emerg Srvs Sfty and Survi (3)

CCTE Course


French (FREN)


101. Elementary French I (3)

Conducted in French.


Geography (GEOG)


102. People and Place (3)

World geography; human elements. A systematic analysis of world population, demographic factors, ethnic groups, predominant economies and political units and their distribution, interrelation and interaction with the physical earth. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 1213).


General Studies (GNST)


093. General Studies (3)

General reading and class discussion in topical areas of interest requested by students or community entities. The course will not duplicate any current departmental offerings.

095. Practicum (3)

CCTE Course.

195. Practicum II (3)

CCTE Course


German (GRMN)


101. Elementary German I (3)

Language course sequence for all beginning students, providing a foundation in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills for all subsequent courses. Fall, Spring. (Main Campus Course)

102. Elementary German II (3)

Language course sequence for all beginning students, providing a foundation in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills for all subsequent courses. Fall, Spring. (Main Campus Course)


Health Careers Dental Assist (HCDA)


101. Introduction to Dental Assisting (3)

This course will introduce the student to forehanded dentistry to include: asepsis and OSHA recommendations related to general operative procedures, medical history, vital signs, and charting.

110. Dental Ethics Professionalism (3)

Ethical and legal issues and professional conduct related to dentistry and dental assisting. Cases evaluated to determine appropriate management according to principles of dental ethics and jurisprudence. Review and interpretation of dental practice acts and licensure. Restriction: Instructor Approval. Prerequisite: HCDA 101.

120. Dental Assisting Pre-Clinical I (4)

An introduction to forehanded dentistry including aseptic techniques, moisture control, local anesthesia, instrumentation, dental materials and general operative procedures.

125. Dental Assisting Pre-Clinical II (3)

A continuation of Preclinical I with emphasis on forehanded techniques in the six recognized specialties.

130. Dental Radiology (3)

Instruction in the basic principles of radiation physics, and modern intra- and extra-oral dental radiographic techniques. It includes exposing radiographs, arrangement and care of darkroom equipment, composition and preparation of developing solutions, processing and mounting films. Radiation safety and protection guidelines will be emphasized.

135. UNM Clncl Dntl Asst (2)

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Open Learning

140. Dental Education (3)

Various aspects of dental disease prevention will be covered. This will include coronal polishing of teeth, providing one-on-one oral hygiene instruction, the importance of nutrition, and the psychology of patient behavior.

145. Clinical Dental Assisting I (3)

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting.

155. Clinical Dental Assisting II (4)

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting with an emphasis on refinement of chair side skills.

164. Seminar in Dental Assisting Topics (3)

This unit is designed to instruct the student in variety of topics and basic fundamentals in dentistry. It includes both didactic and clinical application of the topic.


Health Careers Health Sciences (HCHS)


101. Phlebotomy (3)

Introduction to the practice of phlebotomy, blood specimen collection, and processing. Content areas consist of: general safety and universal precautions, professionalism and ethics, equipment and supplies, anticoagulants, site selection, vein puncture and capillary puncture techniques, and specimen processing.
Pre/co-requisites: Permission of the Instructor.

111. Medical Terminology (3)

An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes. Fall, Spring, Summer.

113. Basic Body Structure & Function I (4)

This is an introductory course in Anatomy and Physiology for students from diverse backgrounds and varying levels of educational preparation. No prior knowledge of biology or chemistry is assumed.

115. Pharmacology for Health Occupations (3)

An introduction to classifications of drugs, usage and contraindications. Spring

123. Human Growth and Development (3)

125. Intro to Pharmacology (3)

This course will present the basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis will be placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic action, adverse reactions, routes of administration and calculation of drug dosages and solutions.

193. Topics in Health Science (1-9)

Study of specific topics related to the health sciences.

293. Topics II (1-3)

Study of specific topics related to the health sciences. Prerequisite: permission of Department chair. Fall, Spring, Summer.


Health Information Technology (HCHT)


121. Health Information Technology I (4)

An overview of health records services in the United States and the role of the health record practitioner. It introduces the student to the principles and practices of the health records profession. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

211. Basic ICD/CPT Coding (4)

An overview of the development of medical nomenclature and classification systems. This course presents the principles of coding of diseases and surgeries, and offers classroom lab practice of coding skills. This is an on-line course. Prerequisite: HCHS 113 and HCHS 111.

213. Principles of Disease (4)

Introduction to human pathophysiology for non-nursing health professionals. Content includes: normal pathophysiology over the lifespan, abnormal pathophysiology, cellular function, immunity, gastrointestinal, nervous, skeletal, and integumentary systems. Prerequisites: HCHS 111 and HCHS 113.

215. Advanced OP Coding (2)

Covers the development and format of CPT and ICD. Included are instructions for basic coding guidelines, descriptions and definitions of symbols, correct usage of modifiers, overviews of the appendices in the CPT manual and guidelines for using the index. Prerequisite: HCHT 211. Use of encoder software will be included.

219. Advanced Inpatient (IP) Coding (3)

Practice assigning ICD-9, ICD-10, and ICD-10 PCS codes using inpatient diagnosis, procedures and reports, using the 3M encode. Prerequisites: HCHT 211

221. Medical-Legal & Quality Management (4)

Study of legal principles governing health information management. The medical record as a legal document. Standards and regulations governing medical records in various groups and agencies. Study of the methods used by healthcare facilities for assuring the provision of high quality medical quality care. Prerequisite: HCHT 121

222. Health Information Technology II (4)

This course covers supervisory principles and electronic medical records, including collection, arrangement, presentation and verification of healthcare data. Also included are reimbursement methodologies, confidentiality rules and regulations, and uses of coded data. Prerequisite is HCHT 121.

231. Computer App/Statistics in Healthcare (4)

This course presents the development of health information systems, computer applications in the healthcare industry, and methods used to control accuracy and security of information. Included are the concepts and procedures used in preparation of statistical reports including vital statistics, census systems and commonly computed rates and percentages. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

232. Reimbursement Methodologies (3)

This course presents information about insurance programs and federal healthcare legislation. It provides a basic knowledge of claims management, medical necessity and coding systems. Pre/co-requisite: HCHT 211.

233. Professional Practice Experience (6)

In this course the student applies skills, concepts and theory from previous classroom experiences in various healthcare environments. Students are under the direction of faculty and health information preceptors. Pre/co-requisites: satisfactory completion of all HCHT Program Core courses.


Health Education (HED)


164L. Standard First Aid (1-3 to maximum of 3)

Preparation in knowledge and skills to meet the needs in situations when basic first aid care is needed. Students eligible for Standard First Aid Certification and CPR Certificate. (Main Campus Course)

171. Personal Health Management (3)

Exploration of the major areas of health information pertinent to understanding how to achieve, maintain, and promote positive health. Topics covered include mental health, drugs, human sexuality, prevention and control of diseases, nutrition, consumer health, and ecology. (Main Campus Course)


History (HIST)


101. Western Civilization to 1648 (3)

Ancient time to 1648. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)

102. Western Civilization Post 1648 (3)

1648 to Present. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)

161. History of the United States to 1877 (3)

Survey of the economic, political, intellectual, and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1607 to 1877. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)

162. History of the United States Since 1877 (3)

Survey of the economic, political, intellectual, and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1877 to the present. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)

182. Modern Latin American History (4)

Bieber, Hutchison. Surveys the nations of Latin America from their independence until the present. Emphasizes the process of nation-building, governance, socioeconomic integration and coping with modernization. Special attention given to great leaders of Latin America. (S) Spring. (Main Campus Course)

220. Studies in History (1-3)

Will vary from instructor to instructor but will offer a review of particular historical issues designed for the nonspecialist. For content of particular courses, see Schedule of Classes and contact Department. (S). Fall, Spring. (Main Campus Course)

260. History of New Mexico (3)

Introduction to New Mexico history from earliest human settlement to the present day. (Main Campus Course)


Human Services (HS)


101. Introduction to Human Services (3)

An overview of the caregivers, the delivery systems, and the types of services provided within the field of Human Services with particular emphasis on the development of the field and the roles and functions performed by these new professionals. Fall, Spring.

105. Group Dynamics (3)

Drawing on both theoretical and observer- participation models, the student will explore various relationships as they develop in dyads, small-group and large-group settings. Related practical experience from field placement to group models of interaction. Pre/Co-requites: HS 101; Fall, Spring.

120. Principles of Interviewing and Assessment (3)

Introduction to entry level interviewing, communication and interactional skills that include strength-based approaches for engagement and problem identification, data collection, assessment, identification of possible interventions, evaluation and termination of services for diverse populations. Pre/Co-requites: HS 101
Fall, Spring.

200. Adolescent Substance Abuse: Prevention and Treatment (3)

Overview of the continuum of care for adolescents including management, co-occurring disorders mandatory report issues, family substance abuse, domestic violence and juvenile justice issues. Includes cultural competency treatment implications with diverse populations. Pre/Co-requisite: HCHS 140; Spring

280. Internship in Human Services (3)

Application of theories, experience and classroom instruction to an agency setting. The internship requires a total of 150 hours in an approved human services agency and attendance at bi-weekly seminars. Pre/Co-requisite: HS 281; Spring

281. Professional Issues in Human Services (3)

Legal and ethical issues emanating from the professional helping relationships in human services and substance abuse treatment such as confidentiality, privileged communication, dual relationships, competency and reciprocal roles of responsibilities of both client and helper. Pre/Co-requisite: HS 280; Spring


Information Technology (IT)


101. Computer Fundamentals (3)

Prerequisite: IT 118 or equivalent. Introduction to computers for beginners. Topics include vocabulary, descriptions of hardware, software, and using a computer in educational and business situations.

121. Introduction to Electronic Spreadsheets (3)

Prerequisite: CS150. Students use state of the art spreadsheet software to create and modify workbooks, explore typical business applications and create charts and graphs.

125. Microcomputer Operating Systems (3)

Prerequisite: CS 150. Introductory concepts in micro-computing operating systems. Acquaints students with practical aspects of micro-computer operating systems including file management systems, utilities, and computer peripherals.

131. Introduction to Hardware Installation (3)

Prerequisites: READ100 or Compass>=71. Hands-on introduction to current personal computer technology. Students learn and practice hardware and software topics covered by the A+ exam.

166. Business Web Page Design (1-3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Introduction to designing and creating Web pages for the Internet.

230. Computer Networking (4)

Prerequisite: READ 100, ISE 100, ISM 100 or equivalent. Knowledge of Windows and computer hardware is strongly recommended. Provides baseline level of knowledge for success in industry and preparation for networking certifications. Covers networking hardware, software, and skills necessary to succeed in the dynamic field of computer networking.


Linguistics (LING)


101. Introduction to the Study of Language (3)

Broad overview of the nature of language; language structure, biology of language, language learning, language and thought, bilingualism, social and regional variation, educational implications. Intended to fulfill breadth requirements in any college. 101 and ANTH 110 may not both be counted for credit. (Main Campus Course)


Mathematics (MATH)


099. Pre-Algebra (4)

A pre-college mathematics course. Emphasis is placed on basic operations, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and introductory algebra and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RCR/RNC.

100. Introduction to Algebra (4)

Topics covered include linear equations, polynomials, factoring, formulas, graphing, and applications problems and include a skills laboratory. Prerequisite/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099. Offered on a RCR/RNC (credit/no credit) basis only.

106. Problems in Intermediate Algebra (1)

Student session for 120 with emphasis on problem solving. Offered on CR/NC basis only.

107. Problems in College Algebra (1)

Study session for 121 with an emphasis on problem solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

108. Problems in Pre-Calculu (1)

Students will be required to do the homework in class under the Instructor's supervision. Problems in Pre-Calculus helps students in MATH 150 Pre-Calculus. Co requisite: MATH 150; Prerequisite: MATH 121

110. Problems in Elements of Calculus I (1)

Study session for MATH 180 with an emphasis on problem-solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

111. Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers I (3)

Course offers an in-depth look at the representations of rational numbers, including base-ten and decimal numbers, integers, fraction and arithmetic operations on these sets. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisites: 120 or 121 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 180 or STAT 145 or MATH 100 or ACT=>19 or SAT=>450 or Compass Pre-Algebra>56 or Algebra >33. (Main Campus Course)

113. Basic Mathematics Recitation (1)

Build a strong connection to the topics covered in Math 111 through hands on activities, group discussions, and problem solving techniques. Prerequisite: 100 or Placement score. Co-Requisities: 113.

115. Technical Mathematics (3)

Intended for students in applied trade technologies. Topics include a review of basic arithmetic, elementary algebra, applied geometry, measuring instruments, and formulas. Prerequisite: MATH 100.

120. Intermediate Algebra (3)

Preparation for MATH 121, 129 and STAT 145. Covers linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, exponents, radicals, fractional expressions, and equations, quadratic equations, perimeters, areas of simple geometric shapes, AND logarithms. Emphasis on problem solving skills. The grading scale for this class is A+ to B-. CR/NC. Prerequisite: ACT=>19 or SAT =>450 or MATH 100 or Compass Pre-Algebra >56 or Algebra >33. (Main Campus Course)

121. College Algebra (3)

Preparation for Math 150 and Math 180. The study of equations, functions and graphs, especially linear and quadratic functions. Introduction to polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications involving simple geometric objects. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics. Prerequisite: ACT=>22 or SAT =>510 or MATH 120 or Compass Algebra >54 or College Algebra >33. (Main Campus Course)

123. Trigonometry (3)

Definition of the trigonometric functions, radian and degree measure, graphs, basic trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers, polar coordinates and graphs, vectors in 2 dimensions. May be taken concurrently with MATH 150. Prerequisite: ACT=>25 or SAT=>570 or MATH 121 or Compass College Algebra >54. (Main Campus Course)

129. A Survey of Mathematics (3)

An introduction to some of the great ideas of mathematics, including logic, systems of numbers, sequences and series, geometry and probability. Emphasizes general problem solving skills. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics. Prerequisite: ACT=>22 or SAT =>510 or MATH 120 or 121 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 163 or 264 or 180 or 181. (Main Campus Course)

150. Pre-Calculus Mathematics (3)

In-depth study of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations, conic sections, parametric equations and applications in geometry. Exploration of the graphing calculator. May be taken concurrently with MATH 123. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics. Prerequisite: ACT=>25 or SAT =>570 or MATH 121 or College Algebra >54. (Main Campus Course)

162. Calculus I (4)

Derivative as a rate of change, intuitive, numerical and theoretical concepts, applications to graphing, linearization and optimization. Integral as a sum, relation between integral and derivative, and applications of definite integral. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics. Prerequisite: ACT=>28-31 or SAT =>640-700 or MATH 150 or Compass College Algebra >66 and (MATH 123 or Compass Trig>59) or (ACT=>32 or SAT=>720). (Main Campus Course)

163. Calculus II (4)

Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, numerical integration, improper integrals, sequences and series with applications, complex variables and parameterization of curves. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in MATH 162. (Main Campus Course)

180. Elements of Calculus I (3)

Limits of functions and continuity, intuitive concepts and basic properties; derivatives as rate of change, basic differentiation techniques; application of differential calculus to graphing and =minimum/maximum problems; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics. Prerequisite: ACT=>26 or SAT =>600 or MATH 121 or MATH 150 or Compass Algebra >66. (Main Campus Course)

215. Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers III (3)

Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: topics from probability and statistics with connections to other topics in the elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisites: 111. (Main Campus Course)

264. Calculus III (4)

Vector operations, vector representation of planes and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals and Green's theorem. (I)
Prerequisite: 163 with a grade of "C" (not "C-") or better.


Management (MGMT)


101. Fundamentals of Accounting I (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. The development of the accounting cycle, special journals and financial statements. Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. degree.

102. Fundamentals of Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: MGMT 101. Continuation of 101, including corporation and manufacturing accounting and decision making. (Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. degree.)

103. Bookkeeping (3)

Designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of principles of bookkeeping and undertake essential bookkeeping and financial record keeping routines for a small business. Prerequisite: READ 100 or Compass-Reading >=71 and ISE 100 and MATH 111.

113. Management: An Introduction (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. Modern concepts of organizations and their management. An overview of functional activities within business and other organizations. Upon demand. (Main Campus Course)

158. Ethics in Organizations (3)

Introduction to ethical issues in business, government, and nonprofit organizations and how to deal with those issues. Emphasis on ethical reasoning and cases of ethical and unethical behavior in management and the professions.

190. Special Topics in Management (3)

Selected offering of management topics not represented in the regular curriculum.

195. Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. A survey course that examines topics including: the entrepreneurial process and economy, the entrepreneur's profile and characteristics, youth and social entrepreneurship.

202. Principles of Financial Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: READ 100 or COMPASS ? 71, ISE 100, MATH 118. An examination of the conceptual framework of accounting and the functions of accounting in a business-oriented society. Topics include valuation theory and its applications to assets and liabilities, concepts of business income, funds flow analysis, problems of financial reporting. (Main Campus Course)

222. Introduction to Marketing (3)

A complete overview of the system for assessing customer needs, allocation of scarce resources to fulfill those needs, transmittal of market related information, completion of exchange processes, and profit maximization in free markets. Emphasis on interdisciplinary tools for management, decision making, and developing marketing strategies in domestic and international market applications. Credit not applicable to BBA degree. (Main Campus Course)

290. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: Math 180 or equivalent. An overview of the use of statistics in business descriptive statistics and numerical characteristics of data; introduction to probability; statistical inference including t- tests and regression; confidence intervals, applications to business problems will be emphasized. (Main Campus Course)


Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT)


111. Introduction to Basic Laboratory Skills, Urinalysis, and Body Fluids (4)

An introduction to the profession of medical diagnostic testing and the clinical laboratory. Content areas consist of: general laboratory safety, laboratory mathematics, general instrumentation, use of the microscope, urinalysis, and body fluids. Pre-/co-requisites: ENGL 101, MATH 119 or 122, and MLT 211 or consent of the instructor. Students are required to co-enroll in MLT 211 - Clinical Hematology and Coagulation. Prerequisite Validation: English and Mathematics competency are essential for the student to master the MLT core curriculum and progress toward the Associate of Science Degree.

112. Clinical Practicum: Phlebotomy (1)

Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience in blood sample collection and processing that includes both Venipuncture and capillary puncture techniques. Pre/co-requisites: HCHS 101 and MLT 111 or permission of instructor.

211. Clinical Hematology and Coagulation (4)

Introduction to the theory and practice of clinical hematology. The course includes: erythropoiesis, leukopoiesis, cell enumeration, the hemogram, white blood cell morphology, differentials, coagulation testing, platelets, routine manual and automated methods, and correlation with pathologies.

214. Clinical Microbiology (5)

Comprehensive current clinical study of bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology; macroscopic and microscopic identification; biochemical identification profiles; bacterial antibiotic susceptibility patterns; parasitic life cycles. Pathology and epidemiology. Introduction to rickettsias and viruses. Prerequisites: MLT 111, 112 and MLT 211.

216. Clinical Chemistry (4)

Theory, principles and procedures applicable to clinical chemistry. Focus on chemical analysis of blood and other body fluids using manual and automated techniques. Application to tests in the diagnosis of disease with review of abnormal physiology. Prerequisites: 111, 214, MATH 121.

219. Immunohematology and Serology (4)

Principles, procedures, and pathology for serology. Routine and advanced test procedures to identify and enumerate antibodies. Principles and procedures in Blood Banking. Introduction to genetics. Processing blood components for compatibility testing. Regulation dictated by AABB and FDA. Prerequisites: 111, 214, 216, 217, Math 121. Spring.

271. Directed Clinical Practicum I (4)

Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience includes rotations through urinalysis, hematology, and microbiology. Prerequisites: 111, and 214.

281. Directed Clinical Practicum II (6)

Continuation of MLT 271. Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience includes rotations through blood bank, microbiology, advanced hematology, and serology.

291. Preparation for MLT Board Examinations (2)

Designed to integrate theory with MLT directed clinical practicum. A comprehensive and current review supplemented by reading assignments and questions on the following subjects: sample collection, coagulations, chemistry, microbiology, blood banking, serology, urinalysis, and calculations. Pre-/co- requisites: Students must have completed MLT 111, 112, 211, 214, 216, 219 and be concurrently enrolled in either MLT 271 or MLT 281.


Music Education (MUSE)


298. Music for the Elementary Teacher (3)

Will prepare elementary classroom teachers to teach music education in a self-contained classroom in traditional and open situations. (Main Campus Course)


Native American Studies (NATV)


150. Introduction to Native American Studies (3)

This course surveys the significance of Native American Studies through an inter-disciplinary approach for four major areas of academic concentrations; Arts and Literature, Education and Language, Cultural Studies and Environment, and Leadership and Self-determination. (Main Campus Course)

255. Topics in Native Americans Studies (1-3 to a maximum of 6)

Topics courses taught by Native and non-Native faculty from the University of New Mexico and the community, varying according to instructor's expertise. May be repeated as topic varies. (Main Campus Course)


Natural Science (NTSC)


261L. Physical Science (4)

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. A broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the science of geology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy, with emphasis on the sciences processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. The course is activity-based, utilizing a problems and issues based approach; various teaching methods are modeled, and practiced by students; some field trips may be required. (Main Campus Course)

262L. Life Science (4)

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. An activity-based study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology, and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and integration of technology. Various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students; some field trips may be required. Pre-requisite: NTSC 261L and MATH 112, or permission of instructor. (Main Campus Course)

263L. Environmental Science (4)

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. An activity-based interdisciplinary study of major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science process, scientific investigation, field-based activities, and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems, and natural resources. Various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students. Pre-requisite: NTSC 261L and 262L or permission of Instructor. (Main Campus Course)


Nursing (NURS)


202. Intro to Nursing Concepts (3)

This course introduces the nursing student to the concepts of nursing practice and conceptual nursing.

203. Health Care Participant (3)

This course introduces the nursing student to the attributes of the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community.

204L. Principles of Nursing Practice (4)

This course introduces the nursing student to the application of concepts through clinical skills in seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings. Principles of communication, assessments, safety, and interventions, including accurate calculation, measurement, and administration of medications will be included.

219. ADN Capstone (2)

This course prepares students for entry-level nursing practice as an associate degree graduate. The focus of this course is management of individuals across the lifespan with chronic, acute, and select complex conditions. The course utilizes a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical experiences.

221L. Assessment and Health Promotion (4)

This course introduces the nursing student to the assessment of and the health promotion for the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. This course uses seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings.

222L. Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions (4)

The focus of this course is to provide safe, evidence-based nursing care for patients with chronic conditions, across the lifespan in a variety of settings. This course builds upon curricular concepts. This course is a combination of lab and clinical.

238. Nursing Pharmacology (3)

This course introduces the nursing student to pharmacologic nursing practice from a conceptual approach.
Pre- or corequisite: 239 or 240.

239. Pathophysiology I (3)

An introduction to human pathophysiology. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: none

240. Pathophysiology II (3)

This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: none.

251. Health and Illness Concepts I (3)

This course will focus on health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, sexuality/reproductive, protection/movement, and emotional processes.

252. Health and Illness Concepts II (3)

This course will cover health and illness concepts across the lifespan with the focus on chronic conditions. Concepts covered are related to oxygenation and hemostasis, homeostasis and regulation, protection and movement, and cognition and behavior processes.

253. Health and Illness Concepts III (4)

This course will cover health and illness concepts, with the focus on acute conditions across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, oxygenation/hemostasis, protection/movement, and emotional processes.

258L. Clinical Intensive 1 (4)

This is the first of two Level 4 classes in which the student will apply the curricular concepts in the management of care participants with acute conditions across the lifespan. This course is a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical.

291. Professional Nursing Concepts (3)

This course covers foundational concepts for professional development, including selected professional attributes and care competencies.


Nutrition (NUTR)


120. Nutrition for Health (3)

General concepts of nutrition applied to food choices that support health. Cultural, psychological and economic implications of food choices. (Main Campus Course)


Navajo (NVJO)


101. Elementary Conversational Navajo for Non-Native Speakers (3)

Beginning Navajo for students with no previous exposure to the language. Development of all four language skills, with emphasis on listening and speaking. (Main Campus Course)


Physical Ed (Non-Professional) (PENP)


101. Beginning Swimming (1-2)

Instruction for students who have not been in the water or have a fear of water. Pool usage fee. Fall, Summer. (Main Campus Course)

124. Ballroom Dance (1)

Instruction in the basic movements of the fox trot, waltz, lindy, rhumba, tango, and cha-cha. Upon demand. (Main Campus Course)

128. Beginning Country Western Dance (1)

Instruction in basic movements of waltz, two-step, swing, and polka. (Main Campus Course)

155. Pilates (1)

Instruction in movements that increase balance, core fitness and cardiorespiratory endurance.

157. Cardio Kickboxing (1)

A multi dimensional fitness program that is incorporated in kicking and boxing skills.

160. Weight Training and Physical Conditioning (1)

Individual training programs for development of general strength, tone, weight control, and endurance. Fall, Spring, Summer. (Main Campus Course)

162. Jogging Fitness (1)

Individualized running programs for improved cardio-respiratory endurance. Fall, Spring, Summer. (Main Campus Course)

164. Walk for Wellness (1)

Designed to introduce the basic fundamentals of personal fitness. The workout will consist of correct posture, arm swing, stride and pace which will lower the risk of injury. The topics covered are the following: principles of fitness, health related and motor skill related components of fitness, weight control, common fitness injuries and stress management.

165. Yoga (1)

Introduction to five areas of yoga which are particularly significant to the Western World. (Main Campus Course)

168. Basketball Competition (1)

Instruction and practice of game skills in a team setting. (Main Campus Course)

175. Zumba (2)

182. Martial Arts (2)

193. Topics (1-2)

Upon demand. (Main Campus Course)


Philosophy (PHIL)


101. Introduction to Philosophical Problems (3)

Philosophical issues and methodology illustrated through selected problems concerning values, knowledge, reality; and in social, political and religious philosophy. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. (Main Campus Course)

156. Reasoning and Critical Thinking (3)

The purpose of this course is to help students learn how to analyze, critique and construct arguments in context, in other words, how to read and write argumentative essays. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Writing and Speaking.(Main Campus Course)

211. Greek Philosophy (3)

A survey of classical Greek Philosophy. The Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. Concepts of nature and culture, theories of the self, concepts of being; happiness, virtue, and the good life. (I)


Physics (PHYC)


102. Introduction to Physics (3)

Designed to introduce non-science majors to basic concepts, laws and skills in physics, in various applications to ordinary life. Energy, momentum, force, wave phenomena, electric charge and light are discussed; also basic properties of gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces. Selections from relativity, quantum theory, atoms and molecules will be included. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. (Main Campus Course)

102L. Introduction to Physics ()

Students involve themselves in experiments and projects showing basic concepts related to the atom, the environment and the universe. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science (NMCCN 1114). Two hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 102. (Main Campus Course)

151. General Physics (3)

Mechanics, sound, heat, fluid, waves. The sequence (151, 151L, 152, 152L) is required of pre-medical, pre-dental and pre-optometry students. Only 151 and 152 are required of pharmacy students. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or MATH 180 or ACT>27 SAT>630. (Main Campus Course)

151L. General Physics Laboratory (1)

Mechanics, sound, heat. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. (Main Campus Course)

152. General Physics (3)

Electricity, magnetism, optics. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. (Main Campus Course)

152L. General Physics Laboratory (1)

Electricity, magnetism, optics. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. (Main Campus Course)


Political Science (POLS)


200. American Politics (3)

Survey of American politics, including political behavior of the American electorate, the theory of democracy, the structure and function of American political institutions, and contemporary issues.


Psychology (PSY)


105. General Psychology (3)

Overview of the major content areas in psychology. Topics to be covered include learning, cognition, perception, motivation, biological systems, social and abnormal psychology, development, personality and approaches to psychotherapy. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social Behavioral Sciences. (Main Campus Course) Available every semester.

211. Applied Psychology (3)

Topics in applications to everyday life, such as personnel selection, consumer psychology, and environmental problems. Fall.

220. Developmental Psychology (3)

Overview of the physical, perceptual, motor, cognitive, emotional and social development of children from infancy through adolescence. Prerequisite: 105. (Main Campus Course) Available every semester

230. Adjustment and Interpersonal Relations (3)

Processes of normal human adjusting and coping in both personal and interpersonal spheres. Topics include applications of psychology to stress and mood management, self-esteem, social adjustment, communication and relationships. Spring.

250. Special Topics in Psychology (1-3, no limit )

Study of any psychological topic not otherwise included in the curriculum upon expression of mutual interest by students and faculty. May be repeated for credit provided the subject matter varies. (Main Campus Course)

280. Health Psychology (3)

This course introduces Health Psychology. The course will cover the role of stress in illness, coping with chronic illness, stress, and pain, and the role of health behavior in health and disease. (Main Campus Course)


Religion (RELG)


107. Living World Religions (3)

Introduction to major living world religions, such Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism.


Sociology (SOC)


101. Introduction to Sociology (3)

Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. Prerequisite for more advanced courses in sociology. (Main Campus Course)

213. Deviance (3)

Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explanations of the causes of, and attempts to address these behaviors. Prerequisite: 101. (Main Campus Course)

221. Documenting Globalization and Human Rights (3)

The course will focus on human rights issues in the broader sociopolitical context of globalization, and will analyze how social change in relationship to human rights mobilization and contestation occurs. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. (Main Campus Course)


Spanish (SPAN)


101. Elementary Spanish I (3)

Beginning Spanish for students with no previous exposure to Spanish. Development of all four language skills, with emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking. (Main Campus Course)

102. Elementary Spanish II (3)

Beginning Spanish for students who have completed 101 or equivalent. Continued development of four skills with emphasis on listening and speaking. (Main Campus Course)


Statistics (STAT)


145. Introduction to Statistics (3)

Techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data, descriptive statistics, introduction to probability and basic probability models used in statistics, and introduction to sampling and statistical inference, illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. Prerequisite: ACT =>22 or SAT =>510 or MATH 120 or 121 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 163 or 264 or 180 or 181. (Main Campus Course)

279. Topics in Introductory Statistics (1 to 3 to a maximum of 3 )

Offered upon demand. (Main Campus Course)


Sustainability Studies (SUST)


250. Home Energy Audits (3)


University (UNIV)


101. Seminar: Introduction to UNM and Higher Education (1-3)

Designed to accelerate successful transition to the academic environment at a research university.


Welding Technology (WLDT)


101. Welding Blueprint Reading (4)

Introductory course on welding blueprint reading and related theory. Students demonstrate competency by satisfactory completion of instructional modules and American Welding Society Standards. Course combines lecture and laboratory instructional formats.

104. NCCER Core (4)

105. Arc Welding I (4)

This course will introduce the student to the process of electrode manipulation, position welding and use of the different welding machines. Fall.

107. Advanced Arc Welding (4)

Directed to achieving high quality S.M.A.W. welds, which conforms to specific codes and procedures. Competency in this course is encouraged before attempting pipe classes. Course will introduce American Welding Society D5.0 welding qualification codes. Prerequisite: 104*, 105*, 106*.

108. Oxyfuel Welding I (4)

This course will introduce the student to gas welding process. The student will learn to handle and use the acetylene gas form of welding. Spring.

112. Gas Metal Arc Welding I (3)

130. Pipe Welding (4)

Utilizes advanced Arc and oxyacetylene welding skills and techniques on ferrous pipe in a rotating and/or a fixed position. Emphasis is placed on the open groove pipe joint. Course will include alignment techniques, oxyacetylene cutting of pipe, pre-heat interpass temperatures, and mechanical preparation of the joints. Spring. oxyacetylene and tempering and hardening steel and its alloys are also taught. Spring.

141. M.l.G. and T.l.G. Welding (4)

Arc Welding Course designed to further the knowledge and skills of welders. The course begins with a short review of pipe welding and groove welds on plate in all positions and covers stainless steel, cupro nickel alloys, hard facing processes, gas metal arc welding or M.l.G. and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding or T.l.G. Advanced uses for

201. Welding Metallurgy, Math and Communication (4)

Second part of core curriculum component. Students will study Metallurgy, Math and Communication skills for welding technology.

212. Gas Metal Arc Welding II (4)

230. Pipe Welding II (3)

251. Layout and Fabrication (4)

Designed as a first course in layout and fabrication. The course stresses layout symbols, lines and fabrication, shop procedure and machines. The course is primarily a course in how to layout and build using the basic concepts of plumb, level and square, the anatomy of circles and curves and how to apply them are also stressed. Fall.

295. Welding Practicum (3-9)

A planned program of study and activity designed to give the student practical experience which involves student responsibilities and uses student knowledge and skills to provide an advanced learning experience. Arranged.