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Accounting (ACCT)


2110. Principles of Accounting I (3)

An introduction to financial accounting concepts emphasizing the analysis of business transactions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the effect of these transactions on the financial statements, financial analysis, and the interrelationships of the financial statements.

2120. Principles of Accounting II (3)

An introduction to the use of accounting information in the management decision making processes of planning, implementing, and controlling business activities. In addition, the course will discuss the accumulation and classification of costs as well as demonstrate the difference between costing systems. Prerequisite: 2110.


American Studies (AMST)


1110. Introduction to Environmental and Social Justice (3)

An introduction to the socially and politically constructed values directing Americans' attitudes toward nature, science and technology and to the impacts of those attitudes on built and natural environments regionally, nationally and globally. (ESJ) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1120. Introduction to Gender Studies (3)

While Gender Studies is truly a vast field of inquiry, there is great symmetry in the ways in which feminist scholars have been engaged with questions as to how disciplinary apparatuses and discourses shape and construct "gender." This course will begin with the process of peeking into this exciting scholarship, focusing on the "intersectional ties" of identity-that is, how gender has been produced in and through other categories of identity, such as race, class, sexuality, and nation. While there are numerous ways to structure such a course, this course will maneuver through the field of Gender Studies with an eye toward feminisms, race, and U.S. Empire through processes of incarceration, colonialism, and war). In this course, we will explore how the "intersectional ties" of identities have been constructed within a range of institutions, discourses, and processes, such as law, medicine, popular culture, nationalism, colonialism, and empire. Throughout, we will pay close attention to how discourses normalize certain types of identities, practices, and behaviors, and mark others as deviant or unnatural. And, of course, we will look for strategies to contest these productions. This will necessarily place us within key debates in feminist studies of power, agency, activism, and justice at the individual, community, national, and transnational levels, and allow us to end the course by interrogating the role of Gender Studies in regard to current U.S. occupation in the Middle East and Native America. This course will provide a strong foundation for you to pursue studies in feminist, queer, critical race, and postcolonial theories. (GS)

1130. Introduction to American Popular Culture (3)

This course considers a range of theoretical approaches to the study of popular culture, including cultural studies and feminist theory as well as key concepts and key debates in the study of popular culture. It explores the ways popular culture is implicated in the formation of social determinants such as ethnicity, race, gender, class, and sexuality and conversely, how these social determinants are implicated in the formation of popular culture. The course also considers the ways in which popular culture serves as a site of ongoing political struggle. The aim of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary to make sense of broader significance and relevance of popular culture--why popular culture matters. To accomplish this, we will investigate a number of popular expressive forms including magazines, fandom, digital music, and hip hop. (PC)

1140. Introduction to Race, Class and Ethnicity (3)

This course offers an introduction to the field of American Studies through an interdisciplinary examination of race, class and ethnicity in the United States and in a global context. Using a schedule of keywords, we will engage a range of central themes and concerns. We will examine histories of injustice, and resistance to injustice. Readings and assignments encourage students to notice the privilege and oppression at the core of U.S. society. The class will challenge the widely accepted assumption that we as a nation have moved beyond race and racism. Through readings, films, online sources, and our assignments, this course aims to increase our knowledge of inequality in our society, and the impact of those inequities on various societies and individuals. (RCE) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1150. Introduction to Southwest Studies (3)

This course introduces the complex histories, social issues, and cultural experiences of peoples of the southwestern United States. Course materials and discussions also demonstrate the possibilities of interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. We will examine cross- cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion; social and political economy. (SS) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. American Life and Thought (3)

This course introduces students to cultural studies and the alternative interpretations of American history and culture. Particular attention will be paid to indigenous history, country music, tattoos, and American mobilization for war. Course materials and lectures will frequently utilize cultural traditions to explore key concepts and issues. Additionally, this course will require students to assume an analytical and critical perspective on academic interpretive models. We will read texts that exemplify critical Marxist, feminist, and reflexive anthropological approaches.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ)


Anthropology (ANTH)


1115. Introduction to Anthropology (3)

Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1135 [1175]. Introduction to Biological Anthropology [Evolution and Human Emergence] (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity. Biological Anthropology concentration students are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 1135L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1135L [1175L]. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory [Evolution and Human Emergence Laboratory] (1)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1135. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1140. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization,supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1155. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)

This is an introductory course which provides an overview of the discipline of Linguistic Anthropology. The course will discuss the implications of language within anthropology, as well as within the sciences and social sciences more generally. The course explores the core concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, such as the basic structure of language, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and social and regional variations that are used to help students understand what it means to be human and the role of language in human societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1170. Human Life [Human Life Course] (3)

Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1170L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1170L. Computer Laboratory in Human Evolutionary Ecology (1)

Introduces the computer as a tool in biological and social science research, provides first-hand experience in data collection, analysis and modeling behavior. No prior computer experience required. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1170.

1211. Archaeological Method and Theory (3)

This class explores different ways of studying and interpreting the past through a survey of archaeology's historical, theoretical, and methodological development. If you are interested in archaeology as a career (or even just trying out an archaeological field school), this course is critical: it will provide you with the basic tools for conducting archaeological research and with an understanding of the background of the discipline. For this reason, this course is required for Anthropology majors with an Archaeology concentration. Even if you know you don't want to be an archaeologist, though, this class may interest you. Have you ever wondered how archaeologists know what they know about the? Are you skeptical about some archaeological claims? Have you ever read a statement about the past and thought, "is this really true?" This class will provide you with the skills, both conceptual and practical, to answer those questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Corequisite: 1211L.

1211L. Archaeological Method and Theory Laboratory (1)

Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Corequisite: 1211.

1996. Topics [Topics in Current Anthropology] (1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ])

2175. World Archaeology (3)

Archaeology is the systematic study of the human past through material remains. This course introduces students to the physical remains of past societies and compares and contrasts archaeological development in different regions. Students will explore the dynamics of the human past and its influences on contemporary society. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2190C. Forensic Anthropology (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the forensic investigation of death. Emphasis will be on current methods and techniques and include the role of the anthropologist as an integral member of the investigation process.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Arabic (ARBC)


1130. Arabic I Intensive (6)

Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Novice High to Intermediate Low level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2130. Arabic II Intensive (6)

Continuation of 1130. Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Intermediate level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2140. Intermediate Arabic I Intensive (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate Mid level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2150. Intermediate Arabic II Intensive (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate High level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.


Arquitecture (ARCH)


1115 [111]. Introduction to Architectural Graphics (3)

Introduction to manual and digital drawing as well as modeling techniques for architectural and interior design. Students will learn how to represent composition, form and space by orthographic drawing, paraline and perspective views, and freehand sketching. Three-dimensional model building techniques will also be introduced.

1120. Introduction to Architecture (3)

This course provides students the tools and vocabulary to analyze, interpret and discuss the built environment from the social, historical, perceptual and technical determinants. Students are introduced to elements, principles, and theories of architecture through their social, historical, and technical determinants. The course seeks to lay a foundation in architectural studies, including introducing students to fundamental vocabulary and concepts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.


Art History (ARTH)


1120. Introduction to Art (3)

In this class, students will be introduced to the nature, vocabulary, media and history of the visual arts, illustrated by examples drawn from many cultures, both Western and non-Western and across many centuries. We will begin with a general overview of the subject, including basic concepts and themes that shed light on the continuity of the artistic enterprise across the span of human experience. We will study the visual elements from which art is made, including how artists use these elements and how the artists' use of visual elements affects our experience of looking at art. We will examine both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, camera and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture, installation, crafts and architecture. Selected works will be examined in context, including the history of the time and place in which they were created, as well as their function, patronage, and the character and intent of individual artists. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. History of Art I (3)

This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

2120. History of Art II (3)

This survey course will explore the architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and glass objects from the 14th century to the modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

2130. Modern Art (3)

This course is an overview of European and American art and architecture during the Modern era. Students will analyze the various movements in art as they relate to the historical settings in which the works were created. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual and cultural movements as they affected and were affected by their creation and development.

2245. History of Photography (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the major trends in the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of photography from its beginnings in the 1830's to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies. Together we will investigate photography's role as an artistic medium as a central focus, as well as its broader role in our visual, political, and social culture. Textbook readings, online lectures, discussions boards, exams, and other activities will assist students in gaining a critical understanding of photography. {Offered upon demand}


Art Studio (ARTS)


1220. Art Practices I (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design.

1230. Art Practices II (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE while developing concepts, techniques, and processes involved in working in the third dimension. Prerequisite: 1220.

1310. Introduction to Ceramics (3)

This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include handbuilding and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing.

1320. Ceramics I (3)

An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. Prerequisite: 1310.

141. Introduction to Art and Ecology (3)

This course introduces the student to three basic skills of an ecological art practice: research, making, and an immersion in ecological systems through poetic thinking, subversive action, and creative fabrication.

1410. Introduction to Photography (3)

This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality,composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively. The historical aspects of photography are also covered.

1510. Introduction to Electronic Arts (3)

This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the Internet to create artwork.

1610. Drawing I (3)

This course introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space and composition.

1630. Painting I (3)

This course introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition. Prerequisite: 1610.

1710. Introduction to Printmaking (3)

This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. Prerequisite: 1610.

1810. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course introduces the basic techniques, materials, and tools traditionally used in the creation of jewelry and/or small-scale sculptural objects.

1830. Shop Foundation (2)

This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

1840. Sculpture I (3)

This course introduces the student to a variety of medium and techniques used in the production of sculpture; along with the historic, conceptual, and esthetic foundations of the sculptural process. Prerequisite: 1830.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2610. Drawing II (3)

This course introduces color and colored media as an element of composition while emphasizing descriptive and perceptual drawing skills and conceptual approaches to contemporary drawing. Prerequisite: 1610.

2630. Painting II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. Prerequisite: 1630.

2810. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fabrication skills are further developed and refined while additional advanced fabrication methods are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding of form and content as it relates to creating on an intimate scale. Prerequisite: 1810.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Astronomy (ASTR)


1115. Introduction to Astronomy (3)

This course surveys observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. The course is predominantly for non-science majors, aiming to provide a conceptual understanding of the universe and the basic physics that governs it. Due to the broad coverage of this course, the specific topics and concepts treated may vary. Commonly presented subjects include the general movements of the sky and history of astronomy, followed by an introduction to basic physics concepts like Newton's and Kepler's laws of motion. The course may also provide modern details and facts about celestial bodies in our solar system, as well as differentiation between them: Terrestrial and Jovian planets, exoplanets, the practical meaning of "dwarf planets", asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. Beyond this we may study stars and galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, black holes, clusters of galaxies and dark matter. Finally, we may study cosmology, the structure and history of the universe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1115L. Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory (1)

Includes hands-on exercises that work to reinforce concepts covered in the lecture, and may include additional components that introduce students to the night sky. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1115.

1996. Topics [Selected Topics] (1-6, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated three times Δ])

Prerequisite: 1115. {Offered upon demand}

2110. General Astronomy I (3)

An introductory course covering the basics of the night sky, relevant physics, and the Solar System. The level of math is trigonometry and pre- calculus. First of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 1230 or PHYS 1310.

2110L. General Astronomy I Laboratory (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with 2110. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2110.

2115. General Astronomy II (3)

An introductory course covering the Sun, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Second of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250. Pre- or corequisite: Any physics course numbered 1200 or higher.

2115L. General Astronomy II Laboratory (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with 2115. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2115.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Automotive Technology (AUTT)


111. Automotive Testing and Diagnosis (6)

Intended to give the student a background in testing and diagnosis of electronic, electrical and fuel systems found in current automobiles.

115. Brake Systems (6)

The study of modern brake theory including drum and disc-type brakes. Mechanical and hydraulic principles as they pertain to brakes will be covered.

130. Electrical System Repair (6)

Electrical theory and diagnosis. Starting, charging, lighting and related electrical systems in automotive application will be studied.

157. Steering and Suspension (6)

A detailed study of steering and suspension components and their repair and alignment. Prerequisite: 150* or equivalent.

167. Emission Control Service (3)

To familiarize the student with the various emission control devices including functions, diagnosis, repair, and/or service.

170. Heating and Air Condition (6)

Covers the basic and advanced instruction of the latest heating and air-conditioning systems, also the testing, diagnosis and repair of A/C compressors and components.

203. Automotive Engine Overhaul (6)

To teach students the repair and overhaul procedure performed on a gas engine.

210. Drive Train Overhaul (6)

Repair and overhaul of drive train components such as clutch, manual transmission, transfer case and differentials found on 2-wheel, 4- wheel and front wheel drive vehicles.

213. Automatic Transmission Overhaul (6)

A detailed study of the overhaul procedures on all current domestic automatic transmissions.

230. Electrical System Overhaul (3)

To review basic electrical theory and learn the testing and overhaul procedures for electrical system components.

293. Automotive Technology Topics (1-6)

A heading for special course offerings, seminars and workshops in various areas of automotive technology. The special offerings will be taught by regular faculty and will focus on topics of special concern on an as-needed basis.

295. Practicum in Auto Technology (3-9)

The student will work on the Gallup Campus in an assignment involving a variety of tasks equivalent to the functions and responsibilities of the line mechanic or parts counter person.

299. Co-op Education in Automotive Technology (3-6)

The student will work in a garage or training facility in the Gallup area and at the same time will be attending the college during part of the day. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hr.


Business Computer and Information Systems (BCIS)


1110. Fundamentals of Information Literacy and Systems [Introduction to Information Systems] (3)

Examination of information systems and their impact on commerce, education, and personal activities. Utilization of productivity tools for communications, data analysis, information management and decision- making. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1215 or (MATH 1215X and MATH 1215Y and MATH 1215Z) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522.


Biology (BIOL)


1110. General Biology (3)

This course introduces non-science majors to basic biological concepts including, but not limited to, the properties of life, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Three lectures. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1110L. General Biology Laboratory (1)

This laboratory course for non-science majors compliments the concepts covered in the associated general biology lecture course. Students will learn quantitative skills involved in scientific measurement and data analysis. Students will also perform experiments related to topics such as biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomic classification and phylogeny, biodiversity, and ecology. One 3- hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1110.

1140. Biology for Health Sciences (3)

This introductory biology course for students interested in health science careers focuses on the concepts of chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, and regulation of gene expression. Not accepted toward the Biology major. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1140L. Biology for Health Sciences Laboratory (1)

This course is a laboratory that complements the concepts learned in the theory course. Students will learn skills involved in scientific measurement, microscopy, and mathematical analysis. Students will also perform experiments and data analysis related to cell structure and function, chemistry, enzyme activity, and genetics. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1140.

1150 [191]. Biodiversity (2)

Biodiversity is the variety of life on earth. There are 2-10 million species on earth, but this number surely is vastly underestimated. Moreover, 99% of all species that ever existed are extinct. This course provides a broad survey of biodiversity-past, present, and future-with an emphasis on major groups in the tree of life (e.g., insects, plants, vertebrates, fungi, bacteria, etc.) and how humans interact with earth's biodiversity. We will explore biodiversity as it relates to earth history, mass extinctions, conservation, economics, ecology, evolution, and human society. We will also explore ways in which we categorize biodiversity (taxonomy and systematics) and catalog it for study (museums).

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110C. Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Lecture and Laboratory (4)

This course introduces students to major topics in general biology. This courses focuses on the principles of structure and function of living things at the molecular, cellular and organismic levels of organization. Major topics included are introduction to the scientific process, chemistry of cells, organization of cells, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Three lectures, one discussion section. Students who completed AP Chemistry in high school should see the instructor of record or a Biology department advisor. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217) and CHEM 1215L.

2210. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for Biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Three lectures. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215).

2210L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1)

This is the first in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Pre- or corequisite: 2210.

2225. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3)

This course is the second of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on specific cellular, tissue, and organ structure and physiology, and organ system structure and function; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Additionally, an analysis of these concepts is included: fluid and electrolyte balance, pregnancy, growth and development from zygote to newborn, and heredity. Three lectures. Prerequisite: 2210.

2225L. Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1)

This is the second in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2225.

2305. Microbiology for Health Sciences (4)

This course introduces the basic principles of microbial structure, genetics, and physiology, virology, parasitology, disease, pathogenicity, epidemiology and immunology. Only some emphasis is given to basic biological principles. The course is designed for those obtaining a career in the health sciences. Not accepted toward the Biology major or minor. Credit for both this course and BIOL **351/**352L may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or (CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L)).

2410C. Principles of Biology: Genetics Lecture and Laboratory (4)

Mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and inheritance, molecular basis of inheritance, genes to proteins, genetic models (viruses and bacteria), eukaryotic genomes, genetic basis of development and overview of genomes. Three lectures, 1 discussion section. Prerequisite: 2110C and ((CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217) and CHEM 1215L). Pre- or corequisite: (CHEM 1225 or CHEM 1227) and CHEM 1225L).

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Business Administration (BUSA)


1110. Introduction to Business (3)

Fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate.

1996. Special Topics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Selected offering of topics not represented in the regular curriculum. Restriction: permission of instructor.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Culinary Arts (CART)


101. Introduction to Culinary Arts (3)

Course is designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods in Culinary Arts where laboratory practice will parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures. Also provides an overview of the professionalism in the culinary industry and career opportunities leading into a career pathway to Culinary Arts.

102. Soups, Stocks, and Sauces (3)

Stocks are the backbone of any cuisine on which much of the kitchen depends. Students are introduced to simmering, emulsifications and knife skills and engage in the production of basic stocks while learning classical vegetable cuts. Students will practice production of leading sauces, emulsion, compound, and independent sauces and learn to prepare a variety of soups.

108. ServSafe® Manager (3)

SERVSAFE® FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT TRAINING: National Restaurant Association’s food safety training covers these concepts: the importance of Food Safety, Good Personal Hygiene, Time and Temperature Control, Preventing Cross-Contamination, Cleaning and Sanitizing, Safe Food Preparation, Receiving and Storing Food, Methods of Thawing, Cooking, Cooling and Reheating Food, HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), Food Safety Regulations.

109. Table Top Service (3)

An introduction to the various styles of table service and service standards required of professional wait personnel. Guest relations, order taking, and organization of the dining room will be studied. Students will gain experience through practice within a simulated service environment. Beverage management issues include inventory & purchasing, proper use of glassware, and serving

110. Culinary Arts Internship (3)

This is a work based learning experience in which a three-way partnership is established between the school, an employer or business, and the student for the purpose of providing practical education to the student through productive work opportunities. Experiences take place in a workplace setting and offer teachers and students the opportunity to see a relationship between school courses and career choices.

151. Advanced Basics of Pastry Art (3)

This course will focus on skill development to be able to produce a variety of classic pastries. Included will be: doughs, pastry creams and fillings chocolates, tortes, tarts, mousses Danish and flakey pastries, flourless tortes, etc. In addition to expanding the repertoire of recipes and refining techniques, focus will be on the appearance and presentation of dishes.


Chemistry (CHEM)


1105. Preparation for College Chemistry (2)

A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared, or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for CHEM 1215/1215L. A grade of "CR" can be used as placement into CHEM 1215/1215L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

1106. Foundations of Chemistry (3)

A unique preparatory course for CHEM 1215 and your subsequent chemistry courses. It has a dual purpose; firstly, to help you obtain a solid foundation in the chemical concepts that are essential to your future chemistry and science classes, and secondly to optimize your set of learning skills to help you learn more efficiently, demonstrate your knowledge and succeed in your future fast-paced high-level science courses.

1110C [1110]. Chemistry in Our Community Lecture and Laboratory [Chemistry in Our Community] (4 [3])

This course will introduce non-science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand topics of current interest affecting their communities, such as air and water quality, global climate change, use of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. Experiments will illustrate chemical principles and acquaint students with scientific methods, data processing, critical thinking and scientific writing.

1120C. Introduction to Chemistry for Non-Majors Lecture and Laboratory (4)

This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Three lectures, 3 hours demo lab/recitation. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1215 may not be applied toward a degree program.Credit for both this course and CHEM 1217 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1215Z or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540.

1215. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors (3)

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to general chemistry for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional programs. Students will be introduced to several fundamental concepts, including mole, concentration, heat, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, bonding, physical states, stoichiometry, and reactions. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: ((1105 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540) and ALEKS1 =>50%) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L.

1215L. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors Laboratory (1)

The first-semester laboratory course designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Prerequisite: ((1105 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540) and ALEKS1 =>50%) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215 or 1217.

1217 [131]. Principles of Chemistry I [Principles of Chemistry] (3)

As the first of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity, nature of chemical bonds, molecular structure, the three phases of matter, etc. In addition, the application of these concepts to various chemical sub-disciplines, such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, and materials chemistry. Designed for majors in chemical sciences and engineering, it is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>660. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L.

1225. General Chemistry II for STEM Majors (3)

This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre- professional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1227 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: ((1215 or 1217) and 1215L) or ALEKS2 =>50%. Pre- or corequisite: 1225L.

1225L. General Chemistry II for STEM Majors Laboratory (1)

Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: ((1215 or 1217) and 1215L) or ALEKS2 =>50%. Pre- or corequisite: 1225 or 1227.

1227 [132]. Principles of Chemistry II [Principles of Chemistry] (3)

As the second of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including solutions, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics. Designed for majors in chemical sciences and engineering, it is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1225 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: (1215 or 1217) and 1215L. Pre- or corequisite: 1225L.

1996 [192]. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, no limit Δ])

2120. Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (4)

The second of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Credit for both this course and CHEM **301 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1120C or 1225.

2310C. Quantitative Analysis Lecture and Laboratory (4)

Quantitative analysis is a subdiscipline within analytical chemistry which deals with the identification and assay of a material or its components. Students will learn how chemical characterization involves chemical reactivity, physical measurement, and data interpretation with an emphasis on solution equilibria and electrochemistry. The study of precise and reliable chemical characterization is fundamental to further study and practice in chemistry, biology, medicine, geology, chemical engineering, and many other related fields. The understanding of the methods and limitations of chemical characterization can aid in making informed judgments on a large variety of social and political issues. This course is designed to introduce you to techniques of quantitative analysis and complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. Students will obtain reproducible quantitative laboratory data using classical (volumetric, gravimetric) and simple instrumental (potentiometric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic) methods, as well as analyze and interpret laboratory data using standard statistical and validation approaches. Three lectures, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: (1225 or 1227) and 1225L.


Chinese (CHIN)


1110. Mandarin Chinese I (3)

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is recommended for students who have had little or no experience in the Chinese language. A beginning Mandarin Chinese course is designed to introduce the Mandarin sound system (“pinyin”), basic vocabulary, Chinese characters (either in Simplified or Traditional characters), and basic grammatical concepts and structures. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1130 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. Mandarin Chinese II (3)

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is designed for students who have taken first semester Mandarin Chinese, and focuses on enhancing pronunciation and expanding the vocabulary and grammar dealing with daily activities. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1130. Mandarin Chinese I Intensive (6)

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is recommended for students who have had little or no experience in the Chinese language. The first year intensive Mandarin Chinese course is designed to introduce the Mandarin sound system (“pinyin”), basic vocabulary, and Mandarin Chinese characters (Simplified), and basic grammatical concepts and structures. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1140. Mandarin Chinese II Intensive (6)

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is designed for students who have taken first semester intensive Mandarin Chinese, and focuses on enhancing pronunciation and expanding the vocabulary and grammar dealing with daily activities. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1130.

2110. Mandarin Chinese III (3)

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in second year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is designed for students who have taken first and second semester Mandarin Chinese (or equivalence), and have a basic foundation on Chinese phonetics, characters, and grammars. In order to help students develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1140.

2120. Mandarin Chinese IV (3)

Follows prerequisite to further develop oral and written proficiency up to Intermediate-mid level and initial cultural competency. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 2110.

2150. Chinese Calligraphy (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

This course will include lectures about the history of Chinese calligraphy, the tools used in calligraphy, the five major writing scripts/styles, and strategies to effectively memorize and write Chinese characters. A major part of class time will be dedicated to actual calligraphy writing practice. Student will be practicing and mastering the basic writing techniques of the Standard script/style. Prerequisite: 1140.


Criminal Justice (CJUS)


1110. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

This course provides an overall exploration of the historical development and structure of the United States criminal justice system, with emphasis on how the varied components of the justice system intertwine to protect and preserve individual rights. The course covers critical analysis of criminal justice processes and the ethical, legal, and political factors affecting the exercise of discretion by criminal justice professionals.

1120. Criminal Law (3)

This course covers basic principles of substantive criminal law including elements of crimes against persons, property, public order, public morality, defenses to crimes, and parties to crime.

1170. Introduction to Criminology (3)

The course will explore the crime problem, its context, and especially to explain causes of crime. The course will cover Foundations for Criminology, Theories of Crime, and Types of Crime.

1350. Self Defense for Law Enforcement (3)

Instructs students entering the Law Enforcement profession in a comprehensive self-defense program designed to meet the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for basic police officer training.

1410. Law (3)

An introduction to persons seeking a career in the law enforcement profession with an understanding of criminal law and how it represents the power of government to prevent and punish socially harmful behavior. This course also examines the extent and limits of established rules of procedure in applying the rule of law.

2130. Police and Society (3)

The course presents a focused practical introduction to the key principles and practices of policing. Topics covered include issues of law enforcement fragmentation and jurisdiction, philosophies of policing, enforcement discretion, deployment strategies, use of force, personnel selection, socialization, tactics, and stress.

2140. Criminal Investigations (3)

This course introduces criminal investigations within the various local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. Emphasis is given to the theory, techniques, aids, technology, collection, and preservation procedures, which insure the evidentiary integrity. Courtroom evidentiary procedures and techniques will be introduced.

2160. Field Experience in Criminal Justice (3)

This course is designed to provide actual experience working for a criminal justice agency and the opportunity to apply criminal justice concepts and theory to a field situation. Students already working in an agency will complete an approved learning project while on the job.

2225. Introduction to Corrections (3)

This class will be a basic introduction to the corrections system in the United States, to include the process of an offender in the system and the responsibilities and duties of guards.

2235. Constitutional Criminal Procedure (3)

An examination of the constitutional principles related to the investigation of crimes, arrests, confessions and pre-trial processing of offenders. The focus will be on individual rights found in the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution and the comparable provisions of the New Mexico Constitution.

2440. Police and Patrol Procedures (3)

This course covers the role and functions of police officers, including the basic tasks of preventing crime, enforcing the laws, protecting the innocent, and providing services while utilizing various patrol techniques. In addition, the course will discuss officer safety, use of force and the law enforcement code of ethics.

2460. Traffic (3)

Encompasses a portion of the police officer training standards mandated by the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for police officer training. It provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and properly enforce traffic laws.


Nursing Assistant (CNA)


101. Nursing Assistant (8)

This course prepares students to provide patient care in a home, health care center, or hospital under the supervision of a professional health care provider (RN). Prepares students for the NM Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation (NACEP) exam. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on placement tests for writing, reading, and mathematics or completion of ENGL 100 and MATH 099 with a grade of “CR”.


Construction Technology (CNST)


101. Layout and Framing (4)

A study of wood form construction techniques which include methods of wall, roof and deck framing. Planning the layout of structural members is emphasized. Stress and strain on these structural members is studied in conjunction with the structural capacities of various types of wood and other materials. These courses consist of lab and classroom experiences.

103. Exterior Finishing (4)

A study of exterior trim techniques; selection of doors and windows; method of installing doors and windows. Includes paint, stain, and prefabrication materials. Taught through lab and classroom experiences. Fall.

104. NCCER Core (4)

Required introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for certification. Topics studied include basic math, communications, prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

105. Interior Finishing (4)

A study of the interior of a building which includes methods of wall, ceiling, and floor finishing. The use of different types of covering, paint, paneling, and texture, will be emphasized. The installation of decorative tile for bathroom, kitchen, and floors will be explored. Spring.

106. Cabinet Building (4)

A study of cabinet making. Students will have the opportunity to make kitchen, bathroom and special cabinets. Includes construction methods of cabinet making as well as various finishing techniques. Counter top materials, such as Formica, will be examined. Taught through classroom and lab experience. Fall.

109. Plumbing Theory I (3)

Covers occupational introductions, human relations, safety, tools and equipment used in plumbers trade, plumbing components, sizes of various residential and commercial plumbing systems, pipe fitt ings, pipe joining and cost estimation. Fall.

115. Concrete Pouring and Finishing (4)

A study of the use of concrete in building construction. The use of power tools and hand tools to finish walls and work will be demonstrated. Spring.

118. Alternative Construction (4)

This course will survey the many different types of alternative building construction in use today. Our focus will be on the Southwest, with an emphasis on those types of construction appropriate for the skills and budget of owner-builder. Course study will include readings, lectures, discussions, guest presentation, videos, and several field trips to demonstration projects.

121. Electrical Wiring (4)

A study of wiring procedures including electrical service entrances, switching circuits, fuse and circuit breakers, and ground fault interrupter circuits.

124. Sustainable Energy (4)

Introductory level course study of sustainable alternative energy systems. The focus of the Photovoltaic course is theory, technology, and preparation for certification of students to do commercial installations.

174. Design for Green Building (4)

The course is designed to explore and educate students in sustainable building technology. Students will study past, current practices, and future best practices for green design and building. Prerequisite: CNST 104.

175. Blueprint Reading (3)

An introductory course in blueprint reading to help the student interpret the ideas of others and to express his/ her own ideas in an understandable manner through drawings. It will stress the necessary skills and processes used in architectural drafting. The students will have the opportunity to develop their own originality and ingenuity. Taught through classroom and laboratory experiences.

206. Advanced Cabinet Making (4)

An in-depth study of cabinet making in which both methods of cabinet making and practical aspects of cabinet making will be covered.

208. Furniture Construction (4)

The design and construction of various types and styles of furniture including functional analysis thereof.

293. Construction Technology Topics (1-6)

For special course offerings, seminars, workshops in various areas of construction. Taught on an as-needed basis. Upon demand.

295. Practicum (3-9)

An individualized course of study within the psychomotor domain. Upon demand Prerequisite: Program Coordinator approval.

299. Cooperative Education in Construction Technology (3-6)

This course provides actual work experience. Upon demand. Prerequisite: instructor approval.


Communication (COMM)


1115. Introduction to Communication (3)

This survey course introduces the principles of communication in the areas of interpersonal, intercultural, small group, organizational, public speaking, and mass and social media. Two hours lecture, 1 hour lab.

1130. Public Speaking (3)

This course introduces the theory and fundamental principles of public speaking, emphasizing audience analysis, reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective delivery. Students will study principles of communication theory and rhetoric and apply them in the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches, including informative, persuasive, and impromptu speeches. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

1140. Introduction to Media Writing (3)

This course combines a theoretical foundation with practical applications. It provides an introduction to journalism, as well as an overview of the most common types of writing required in public relations, advertising and strategic communication. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

1145. Sex, Lies, and Fake News: How to Use Media Wisely (3)

Helps students recognize crucial distinctions in media content between truth and rumor, news and advertising, fact and opinion, bias and fairness. Emphasizes responsible and ethical decision making in consuming and producing media.

1150. Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

This course introduces students to the history, models, theories, concepts, and terminology of mass communication, focusing on various media and professions. The course will enable students to develop media literacy skills to interpret mass communication and understand the effects of media on society and their lives.

1155. Communication Across Cultures (3)

An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. The class seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2120. Interpersonal Communication (3)

This course provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will examine the application of interpersonal communication in personal and professional relationships. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

2130. Media Theories (3)

Introduces students to a variety of media theories and models. Focuses on the key issues in media theory, including the nature of mass media, influences on human behavior, and the media as reflector and creator of society.

2135. Media Ethics and Law (3)

The material will introduce you to the history of ethics and sources of our American legal system. We will examine how the law and ethical action are chosen and evolve through resolution of a dilemma - a choice between countervailing interests. Foundational principles, expressed in our charter documents, carry through those areas of law which are most critical to media: We'll examine fundamentals of law, of First Amendment, libel, privacy, open government, copyright and commercial speech. Consequently, this course's content will be relevant in every other Communication course you take between now and your completion of your degree program. Prerequisite: 1140. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

2140. Small Group Communication (3)

Explores the principles and practices of effective participation in small groups, with emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, organizational skills, role theory, conflict resolution, and creative decision-making methods. It combines a theoretical foundation with practical application to help students better understand the dynamics of group communication in both professional and social contexts.

2150. Communication for Teachers (3)

This course will investigate and critically evaluation the influence of identity, communication, and culture on instruction, learning, engagement, classroom community, and the teacher-student relationship.

2185. Multimedia and Visual Communication (3)

This course is an exploration of visual images in mass media. It emphasizes the visual world and promotes visual literacy by helping students to decipher the language of pictures through studying history, technique and imagery. Students will work in the field and in the lab to create visual projects that communicate ideas and concepts clearly. This class will prepare students to work across technology platforms to produce publication quality multimedia stories and projects. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202. Pre- or corequisite: 2135.

2190. Writing and Editing for Multimedia Journalism (3)

Continuation of COMM 1140. This course builds on the skills you have learned, focusing more deeply on the theory and practice of journalism in the digital age. Classes are in a lecture/discussion format, with emphasis on participation by students. We will practice strict adherence to deadlines, writing under pressure sometimes, rewriting, peer editing of stories, constructive criticism, coaching and teamwork. Students will hone skills in grammar, accuracy, attribution, interviews and story structure. We will also study what constitutes a compelling and well-reported, well-written news story — and the multimedia possibilities that go hand-in-hand with such stories. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202. Pre- or corequisite: 2135.

2245. Web Design (3)

This course introduces web page and web design concepts, basic HTML coding skills progressing to the use of Dreamweaver to design a website. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an electronic information delivery product. This course assumes that you already have basic skills as a journalist, and will focus on helping you transfer your skills to the online format. Competency with personal computers required.

2996 [CJ 293]. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, no limit Δ])


Comparative Literature (COMP)


2222 [222]. Fairy and Folk Tales (3)

An exploration of fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures. The course introduces methods of analysis while exploring historical and contemporary roles and interrelationships of the tales. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

224. Literary Questions (3)

Examination of basic questions in comparative literature studies: themes, movements, modes, interaction of literature with other disciplines, etc. Work will be comparative and reading list will represent a cross- section of Western European, American, Russian and Classical literatures. Titles will vary as content varies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.


Cosmetology (COSM)


110. Theory of Cosmetology I (3)

Theoretical training in hygiene, bacteriology, sterilization, sanitation, rules and regulations of State Board and related practical areas.

111. Theory of Cosmetology II (3)

Theoretical training in finger weaving, wigs, chemicals, hot work, skin and hair disorders. State Board rules and regulations and relative practical areas.

120. Manicuring I (2)

Introduction and application on practice hands and patrons. Massage, sanitation, sterilization, State Board rules and regulations.

121. Manicuring II (2)

Introduction to nails, tips, and wraps. Application on practice hands and patrons.

130. Permanent Wave, Shampooing and Styling (3)

Introduction and practical application on mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

131. Permanent Wave, Shampooing & Styling II (4)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology. Prerequisite: 130*.

140. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials I (4)

Introduction and practical application on mannequins. Covering all areas of Cosmetology.

141. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials II (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

212. Theory of Cosmetology III (3)

Theoretical training in anatomy, electricity, chemistry, hygiene and good grooming, visual poise and salon management. Final State Board Exam.

220. Stropping/Honing/Shaving (2)

This course includes the care and styling of scalp and facial hair. It will provide a basic understanding of Barbering and its history. Emphasis is placed on proper use of instruments, personal hygiene, sanitation, recognition of common disorders/diseases and State Board rules and regulations affecting the cosmetologists performing services on clients. This subject is taught by lectures, visual aids, demonstrations, conferences and assigned projects. 50 contact hr.

232. Permanent Wave, Shampooing and Styling III (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology. Prerequisite: 131*.

242. Haircutting/Scalp Treatment/Hair Coloring/Facials (3)

Continuation of practice on patrons and mannequins covering all areas of Cosmetology.

250. Cosmetology Lab I (1-3)

Practical application on mannequins. Review of all areas of Cosmetology.

251. Cosmetology Lab II (1-3)

Practical application on patrons. Review and final State Board Exam in all areas of Cosmetology.

252. Cosmetology Lab III (3)

Practical application of Cosmetology theory. Students will work with clients in a clinic setting and will complete the number of clock hr. required by the State Board of Cosmetology to be eligible to take the State License Exam.

260. Salon Management (2)

Practical training in Business Management, salesmanship, bookkeeping, inventory control and professional attitudes and development.

291. Independent Study (3 - 9)

Designed for students to study research, selected topics, issues and/or problems in Cosmetology. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator. Fall, Spring.

293. Cosmetology Topics (1 - 6)

Special course offerings, semesters, workshops in various areas of Cosmetology as needed. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator. Fall, Spring.


Community and Regional Planning (CRP)


165. Social Issues in Urban and Regional Development (3)

Introduction to the social, economic, political and physical factors involved in the development of cities and towns. Emphasis on the nature of urban form as a reflection of the prevailing past and present political economy of society.

181. Environmental Issues in a Changing World (3)

Development of the major issues, concepts and methods emerging from the relationship of social systems and the natural environment. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

265. Sustainable Community Planning Methods (3)

Teaches the basic concepts, processes and techniques of planning. Students learn to identify planning issues, problems and research questions; collect information to answer these questions; organize and analyze information; and develop policy recommendations.

275. Community Change in a Global Era (3)

This course examines the intersections among globalization, communities, and social action. It focuses on myriad ways global forces impact communities and how they work for local change in a global era.


Collision Repair Technology (CRT)


101. Basic Auto Body (4)

History of Auto Body, auto body materials, parts of an automobile, hand and power tools, methods of strengthening, sheet metal, using fillers for panel repair.

103. Paint & Refinishing Equipment (4)

Detailed study of the uses and properties of paint and refinish equipment, used in the trade for undercoats and topcoats.

105. Auto Welding (3)

Identify the three classes of welding. Explain how to use a MIG welding machine. Identify oxyacetylene welding equipment and techniques. Explain general brazing and soldering techniques used in a body shop. Explain plasma cutting techniques.

106. Restoring Corrosion Protection (4)

Define corrosion and describe the common factors involved in using various materials to protect steel body parts from rusting.

107. Auto Glass/Restraint Systems (4)

Auto glass replacement and restraint systems, restraint system repairs, windshield, door glass, back glass, replacement, operation of air bag system, operation of seat belt, and child safety seat.


Computer Science (CS)


105L. Introduction to Computer Programming (3)

Introduction to Computer Programming is a gentle and fun introduction. Students will use a modern Integrated Development Environment to author small programs in a high level language that do interesting things.

108L. Computer Science for All: An Introduction to Computational Science and Modeling (3)

This course offers an introduction to computer science through modeling and simulation. Students will learn agent-based modeling of complex systems and see the applicability of computer science across fields. Course cannot apply to major in Computer Science or any other major in the School of Engineering. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

151L. Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors (3)

An introduction to the art of computing. Not intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving.

152L. Computer Programming Fundamentals (3)

Introduction to the art of computing. The course objectives are understanding relationships between computation, problem solving, and programming using high-level languages. Prerequisite: 105L or 108L or 151L or ECE 131L.

241L. Data Organization (3)

Data representation, storage and manipulation. Covers the memory organization of data storage and its relation to computation and efficiency. Topics include: linked vs. contiguous implementations, memory management, the use of indices and pointers, and an introduction to issues raised by the memory hierarchy. Programming assignments in C provide practice with programming styles that yield efficient code and computational experiments investigate the effect of storage design choices on the running time of programs. Prerequisite: 152L with a grade of "B-" or better or 259L with a grade of "C" or better.

251L. Intermediate Programming (3)

An introduction to the methods underlying modern program development. Specific topics will include object-oriented design and the development of graphical user interfaces. Programming assignments will emphasize the use of objects implemented in standard libraries. Three lectures, 1 hr. recitation. Prerequisite: 152L with a grade of "B-" or better.

259L. Data Structures with JAVA (5)

An accelerated course covering the material of 151L and 251L in one semester. Topics include elementary data structures and their implementation, recursive procedures, data abstraction and encapsulation, and program organization and verification. Programs will be written in JAVA. Credit not allowed for both 259L and 151L/251L.

261. Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (3)

Introduction to the formal mathematical concepts of computer science for the beginning student. Topics include elementary logic, induction, algorithmic processes, graph theory and models of computation. Prerequisite: (MATH 1240 with a grade of "A" or better) or (MATH 1512 with a grade of "B-" or better).

293. Social and Ethical Issues in Computing (1)

Overview of philosophical ethics, privacy and databases, intellectual property, computer security, computer crime, safety and reliability, professional responsibility and codes, electronic communities and the Internet, and social impact of computers. Students make oral presentations and produce written reports.


Dance (DANC)


1110. Dance Appreciation (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course introduces the student to the diverse elements that make up the world of dance, including a broad historic overview, roles of the dancer, choreographer and audience, and the evolution of the major genres. Students will learn the fundamentals of dance technique, dance history, and a variety of dance aesthetics. Course fee required. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.


Design and Digital Media (DDM)


101. Introduction to the Macintosh Computer (3)

Introduces students to basic functions of the Apple Macintosh computer through the use of selected application software. Topics include opening, saving and printing documents, copying and pasting information, networking, and computer-related health issues.

110. Introduction to Graphic Design (3)

An introductory level course designed to familiarize students with the principles governing good design as it applies to visual communication. Students are acquainted with the history and evolution of graphic design, as well as the terminology and processes necessary to produce printed material in a computer-based design studio environment.

111. Digital Image Editing I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101 and DDM110 or Instructor’s Permission. Introduces the concepts and techniques employed in the electronic manipulation of digital images. The course features the use of Adobe Photoshop software. Students are guided by a step-by-step tutorial.

131. Page Layout I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101, DDM 110, & DMM 280. Introduces the principles of electronic page composition for advertising and publishing. Students learn to use professional page layout software.

141. Computer Illustration I (3)

Prerequisite: DDM 101, Pre- or Co-requisite: 110 or permission of instructor. Introduces students to the concepts and techniques of computer illustration using a step-by-step tutorial for Adobe Illustrator software. Students build on skills learned in other Design & Digital Media courses and add to these the use of Bezier curves, paths and points, color blends and fills and non-linear text for the purpose of creating computer based graphic designs, page formatting and Web page design.

151. Multimedia Authoring I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101 Pre- or Co-requisite: 110. Examines the concepts and methods used in the development of this new form of communication. Topics include project design, interactive programming, and the effective use of color images, animation, video and sound.

171. Web Publishing I (3)

Prerequisite: DDM 101, Pre- or Co-requisite: 110, BSTC 122 or permission of instructor. An introductory level course designed to familiarize students with basic concepts of electronic page design, creation, and publication. Focuses on the use of Adobe PageMill (an Internet authoring tool) to create web pages, preparing photos and graphics for web pages using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Basic usage of HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) is covered as well.

212. Digital Image Editing II (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 111 or permission of instructor. This course builds on the skills developed in DDM 111. Topics include scanning, masking and selection techniques, formatting files for export to page layout programs, object layering, and the retouching of photographic images.

232. Page Layout II (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 131, 101, 110 and 280. Building on skills developed in DDM 131*, this course elaborates on concepts essential to professional page design.

242. Computer Illustration II (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101* & 110*. This course teaches more advanced techniques of computer design and illustration. Topics include the use of filters for stylistic effect, trapping techniques, color separations, and the conversion of continuous tone images to line art.

245. 3-D Illustration (3)

Prerequisite: DDM 101*, 110*, 111* or permission of instructor. An advanced examination of the principles and techniques of 3-D computer illustration. Topics include rendering of bitmapped and Postscript artwork, lathing, extruding, texture mapping and the creation of animated sequences for use in multimedia presentations.

260. Digital Video I (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101*, 110*, 111 *, 151* or permission of instructor. Introduces students to digital video communication, including video capture, editing, and playback of digital movies. Hands-on experience with Adobe Premiere software, and discussion of the role of this new medium.

281. Portfolio Development (3)

Designed to assist students in preparing a portfolio of their work for professional presentation. Course work covers traditional and electronic portfolio development and presentation, as well as refining design and technical skills.

291. Independent Study (1-3)

Permission of instructor required. Designed for students who wish to work on an independent study project outside the realm of regular course work.

293. Topics (1-3)

Courses on a variety of topics are offered according to need and interest in order to explore emerging technologies in the area of graphics communications. Different section numbers indicate different topics. Upon demand.

295. Practicum (3-6)

An individualized course of study for the student to develop a particular area of interest in Design & Digital Media and produce a portfolio of work. Consultation with the Department Chair required.

296. Internship (3)

Prerequisites: DDM 101*, 110*, 111*, 131* or 232*, 141* or 242* or permission from instructor. Repeatable one time for maximum of 6 credits. A culminating course in which the student will gain work experience in a business, institution, or education facility in the Gallup area. The internship could be, (but not limited to) work with: graphic design company, print shop, advertising agency, publisher, museum (interpretative displays), and computer instructional aide.


Drafting Technology (DRFT)


115. Auto CAD Level I (3)

Students build CAD skills, create production drawings, and develop a CAD library of symbols.


Early Childhood Education (ECED)


1110. Child Growth, Development, and Learning (3)

This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the theoretical foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals. The course includes knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all domains of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive and language. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning is emphasized.

1115. Health, Safety, and Nutrition (2)

This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for indoor and outdoor learning environments for young children. The course examines the many scheduling factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy nutrition, physical activity, and rest.

1120. Guiding Young Children (3)

This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical applications of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines and schedule will be presented Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners and including families as part of the guidance approach.

1125. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs (3)

This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation instruments to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

1130. Family and Community Collaboration (3)

This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings is discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies.

2110. Professionalism (2)

This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

2115. Introduction to Language, Literacy, and Reading (3)

This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches and theory-based and research based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented.

2120. Curriculum Development through Play: Birth through Age 4 (PreK) (3)

The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Corequisite: 2121.

2121. Curriculum Development through Play: Birth through Age 4 (PreK) Practicum (2)

The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Prerequisite: 1110. Corequisite: 2120.

2130. Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 (3)

The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included. Corequisite: 2131.

2131. Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 Practicum (2)

The field-based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included. Prerequisite: 1110. Corequisite: 2130.

2240. Infant Toddler Growth and Development: Prenatal to Age 3 (3)

Provides both basic knowledge of typically and atypically developing young children from the prenatal period to 36 months and a foundational understanding for the promotion of the health, well- being and development of all infants and toddlers within the context of family, community and cultural environments. The course examines infancy and toddlerhood with an emphasis on the interrelationship of cognitive, physical, social and emotional development, mental health and early parent-child relationships.


Economics (ECON)


1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Macroeconomic Principles (3)

Macroeconomics is the study of national and global economies. Topics include output, unemployment and inflation; and how they are affected by financial systems, fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisite for most upper-division courses. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2120. Microeconomic Principles (3)

This course will provide a broad overview of microeconomics. Microeconomics is the study of issues specific to households, firms, or industries with an emphasis on the role of markets. Topics discussed will include household and firm behavior, demand and supply, government intervention, market structures, and the efficient allocation of resources. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2125. Society and Environment (3)

Introduces students to environmental and natural resource issues of both global and local scale. No prior economics coursework is required; basic economic tools will be introduced and then applied to a variety of environmental problems. This course will cover a variety of topics, including water and energy conservation, pollution taxes, tradable pollution permits and global warming.

2130. Personal Investing (3)

This is an economics course with no prerequisites. Consequently it should be considered introductory, however it offers a wide-ranging overview of personal finance and the role financial assets can play in achieving personal financial goals. This course won’t make you a millionaire, nor will it prepare you for a career as a hedge-fund manager. The goal is to increase your understanding of how financial markets work, and how to use financial assets as part of a life-long financial strategy. Your understanding of financial markets will be enhanced by learning the tools of economics, incorporating knowledge of human behavior, and becoming familiar with particular aspects of financial markets and assets.

2220. Economics of Race and Gender (3)

The aim of this course is to introduce you to how economics studies some of the main issues affecting men and women of different ethnic or racial backgrounds. Using economic theory as our framework for analysis, our discussions will include analysis of evidence and policies that address the issues at hand. Among the questions we will be addressing in this class are: why do women earn less than men, and blacks less than whites? Why has the labor force participation of women increased over the past half century, while black men’s has decreased? How does marriage affect women’s decision to work? How has the American family changed over the past century, among others.

2996. . Topics [Topics in Economics and Social Issues] (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, may be repeated twice Δ])


Educational Psychology (EDPY)


303. Human Growth and Development (3)

Principles of human growth and development across the life span and implications for education.

310. Learning and the Classroom (3)

The basic principles of learning, particularly cognition, motivation and assessment, and their application to classroom situations.


Education (EDUC)


1120. Introduction to Education (3)

Introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological foundations of education, current trends, and issues in education; especially as it relates to a multicultural environment. Students will use those foundations to develop effective strategies related to problems, issues and responsibilities in the field of education. A field component at an educational site is required.

1125. Introduction to Education in New Mexico (3)

An exploration of contemporary issues around diversity, culture, and education in New Mexico. The course is of special interest to students considering a teaching career. Projects in schools and/or community sites are part of requirements.

1996. Topics [Special Topics] (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, no limit Δ])


Emergency Medical Services (EMS)


106. Emergency Medical Responder (4)

This 72-hour course is designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for entry-level and advanced EMS courses.

113. EMT-Basic (8)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lecture instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Corequisite: 142.

120. Introduction to EMS System (3)

Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS.

142. EMT-Basic Lab (2)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Corequisite: 113.

143. EMT-Intermediate Lab (1)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 180. Restriction: program permission.

151. EMT-I Clinical and Field Experience (2)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and prehospital experience. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Co-requisite: 143 and 180. Restriction: program permission.

180. EMT-Intermediate (5)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate lecture content, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 143. Restriction: program permission.

193. Emergency Medicine Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)


English (ENGL)


100. College Reading and Writing (3)

A developmental English course designed to aid the student in acquiring the basic skills needed for college level reading and writing. Emphasis will be placed on reading comprehension and essay writing development.

111-112. Composition I and II (3,3)

irst and second semester of Composition I and II sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies.

1110. Composition I (3)

Covers Composition I: Stretch I and II in one semester. In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts. They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers, and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. (EPW) Credit for both this course and ENGL 1110X may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication. Prerequisite: ACT English =16-25 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =450-659 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Writing =>279.

1110X–1110Y. Composition I: Stretch I and II (3; 3)

First and second semester of Composition I stretch sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) These are the first and second courses in a two-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for ENGL 1110, all courses in this sequence (ENGL 1110X, ENGL 1110Y) must be taken and passed. Credit for both ENGL 1110X and ENGL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Students with ACT English <16 or SAT Evidence- Based Reading and Writing <450 or Next Generation ACCUPLACER Writing <279 will begin their English Composition Sequence with ENGL 1110X. Prerequisite for 1110Y: 1110X. Restriction for 1110X: permission of department.

1110Z. Enhanced Composition (4)

Covers Composition I Stretch I and II in one semester with a 1 credit hour lab. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) Credit not allowed for both (1110Z and 1110) or (1110Z and 1110Y). Prerequisite: ACT English =15-18 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =430-490 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills =93-108. Restriction: permission of department. {Not offered on Main Campus}

1120. Composition II (3)

In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods. (EPW) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication. Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.

1410. Introduction to Literature (3)

In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning. (LL) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1710. Greek Mythology (3)

Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English. (LL)

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

206. Topics in Popular Literature (3, no limit Δ)

Reading and analysis of popular literary forms such as the spy novel, the detective novel, science fiction, best-sellers and fantasy.

2110. Traditional Grammar (3)

This course surveys traditional grammar, introducing linguistic terminology and methods for identifying and understanding parts of speech, parts of sentences and basic sentence patterns. The course presents terminology and methods designed to increase the student’s understanding of the structure of the language. (LL)

2120. Intermediate Composition (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course builds upon and refines the writing skills acquired in previous writing courses, with a focus on non-fiction prose. Research, composition, exposition and presentation abilities will be practiced and developed. Through analysis and revision, students will develop strategies to improve the versatility and impact of their writing. Course topics and emphases may vary by section. (EPW) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication. Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2210. Professional and Technical Communication (3)

This course will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non- technical audience. (EPW) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication. Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2220. Introduction to Professional Writing (3)

Introductory course in the professional writing concentration. Study of technical writing, public information and public relations writing and freelance nonfiction writing. (EPW) Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2240. Introduction to Studies in English (1)

This course brings together students majoring in English. It is a required course and must be taken before embarking on the major coursework. Students are introduced to the subfields of rhetoric and professional writing; creative writing; literary studies; and critical theory and cultural studies. Students will be introduced to the life of the department through class visits with faculty members, attendance at departmental events, and a variety of readings and discussions. Some class sessions will include conversations about employment or opportunities for graduate school. The final task will be to craft a letter of intent documenting an intended course of study and future goals. Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z.

2310. Introduction to Creative Writing (3)

This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. (CW) Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.

2510. Analysis of Literature (3)

This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing applied to literary techniques, conventions, and themes. Students will learn how to write focused literary analyses, demonstrating their understanding of biographical, critical, cultural, and historical contexts of various writers and genres. Students will also learn proper documentation, as well as other skills, such as quoting, paraphrasing, and integrating sources, both primary and secondary. (LL) Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2540. Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (3)

This course examines a variety of literary genres to explore the historical development of Chicano/a social and literary identities. This survey offers an overview of the history of Chicano/a literature, introducing the major trends and placing them into an historical framework. (LL)

2560. Introduction to Native American Literature (3)

This course will introduce students to the literature produced by Native American authors as well as explore issues relevant to the study of Native American literature. The course will also introduce the basic elements of literary analysis. (LL)

2610. American Literature I (3)

This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture. (LL)

2620. American Literature II (3)

This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture.

2630. British Literature I (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works— essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. (LL)

2640. British Literature II (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works—short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. (LL)

2650. World Literature I (3)

In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. (LL) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2660. World Literature II (3)

In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from the 1600s to the present. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. (LL) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2670. African American Literature (3)

The course introduces students to the African American classics of the slavery era. Daily experiences of the characters in these books become the basis for discussing race, class, gender, revolt, freedom, peace and humanity. (LL)

2993. Workshop (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Various topics in literature, language and writing. (EPW)

2996. Topics (3, may be repeated twice Δ)


Environmental Science (ENVS)


1130. The Blue Planet (3)

To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere and oceans and how ecosystems are linked to the physical environment. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1130L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1130L. The Blue Planet Laboratory (1)

In this course, students will often work together to collect data and students are encouraged to discuss their observations and ideas, but students are expected to write their own answers in their own words on their worksheets. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1130.


Family and Child Studies (FCST)


1120. Introduction to Family and Child Studies (3)

An introduction to the profession of Family Studies including content areas, community agencies and career opportunities.

2130. Marriage and Family Relationships (3)

This course provides insights into contemporary marriage and family situations. Focus is on decision-making for better understanding of families and the broader society.


Film and Digital Media Arts (FDMA)


1520. Introduction to Digital Media [Introduction to Film and Digital Media] (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the histories, innovative concepts, and creative possibilities of digital media. Within both the lecture hall and the studio lab, students will consider a wide variety of digital media processes and applications. Additionally, students will learn fundamental skills in teamwork, storytelling, and design. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1996. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

2110. Introduction to Film Studies (3)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals in film history, criticism, and theory. Though viewing and analysis of a variety of narrative, documentary, and experimental films, students will advance their understanding of key issues in filmic representation and aesthetics. A range of approaches will be employed in understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium, including feminism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, and modernism. Special fee required. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.


French (FREN)


1110. French I (3)

Intended for students with no previous exposure to French, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills aiming toward the ACTFL novice-high level. This is an introductory course designed to teach the student to communicate in French in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of French and Francophone cultures through the identification of cultural products and practices, of cultural perspectives, and the ability to function at a survival level in an authentic cultural content. This course will also develop the student’s sense of personal and social responsibility through the identification of social issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. French II (3)

A continuation of 1110, students will develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first semester, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-low level. This course is designed to increase student fluency in French as applied to everyday situations. Students will also learn to recognize and understand various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, identifying common cultural patterns, describing basic cultural viewpoints, and further developing their sense of personal and social responsibility through the investigation of cultural issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1150. Accelerated Elementary French (6)

An intensive accelerated combination of 1110-1120. Credit for both this course and FREN 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Credit for both this course and FREN 1120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2110. French III (3)

In this third semester course, students will continue to develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first year, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-mid level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in areas of personal interest and in everyday situations. Students will engage in and analyze various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, as well as continue to develop their sense of personal and social responsibility through comparison and contrast of cultural perspectives. Conducted mostly in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 2140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2120. French IV (3)

In this fourth semester course, students will continue to broaden and refine skills gained during previous semesters, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming at the ACTFL intermediate-high level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in situations that go beyond the everyday. Students will evaluate various French and Francophone products, practices, and create ways to demonstrate their sense of personal and social responsibility through participation in cultural interaction. Conducted entirely in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 2140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2140. Intensive Intermediate French (6)

An intensive accelerated combination of 2110-2120. Credit for both this course and FREN 2110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Credit for both this course and FREN 2120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2145. Intermediate French Conversation (3)

Designed primarily to give qualified students of 2110-2120 extra practice in the oral use of the language; therefore, it is recommended that it be taken concurrently with 2110 or 2120. Enrollment limited to 20 students.


First Year Experience (FYEX)


1010. Foundational Math (3)

This course is designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics courses by strengthening key mathematical concepts. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

1020. Math Learning Strategies (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course is designed to help increase awareness of math-based structures in day-to-day life, interpret and evaluate information presented in graphical and visual formats, and use problem-solving tools and concepts to analyze information and arguments.

1030. Critical Text Analysis (1-3)

This course presents the reading process including study reading, critical thinking and analysis. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

1110. First-Year Seminar (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course is designed to help students achieve greater success in college and in life. Students will learn many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success. Topics may include career exploration, time management, study and test-taking strategies to adapt to different learning environments, interpersonal relationships, wellness management, financial literacy, and campus and community resources.


Geography (GEOG)


1115 [181]. Maps and GIScience [Introduction to Maps and Geospatial Information] (3)

Maps are tools for communication. Will explore scale; projections; symbolization; generalization; alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS, remote sensing, multimedia and animated maps.

1115L [181L]. Maps and GIScience Laboratory [Geospatial Field Methods] (1)

Students gain field and laboratory experience in geographic data collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Topics include map reading, spatial sampling and statistics, the global position system (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and cartography.

1150. Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)

Survey of environmental issues related to the degradation of land, air and water resources.

1160. Home Planet: Land, Water and Life (3)

This course introduces the physical elements of world geography through the study of climate and weather, vegetation, soils, plate tectonics, and the various types of landforms as well as the environmental cycles and the distributions of these components and their significance to humans. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1160L. Home Planet Laboratory (1)

Exercises designed to complement 1160. Applied problems in the spatial processes of the physical environment. Map construction and reading, weather and climatic analysis, classification of vegetative and soil associations, landform distribution analysis. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1160.

1165. People and Place (3)

By focusing on issues of globalization, this course provides an overview of core concepts from human geography, including systematic analyses of economic, political, and cultural geography. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1175. World Regional Geography [World Regions] (3)

The regional geography of the world. Both physical and human aspects are studied along with current economic and political problems. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1970. World of Beer (3)

This course examines and the complex and fascinating world of beer. It examines social and ecological influences on its development and explores the functions of beer from historical, economic, cultural, environmental and physical viewpoints.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2115. Information Design in Science and Society (3)

Students learn to communicate complex, scientific data by designing infographics, and to analyze infographics as storytelling devices. This course builds information literacy and communication skills in an increasingly data-driven society.

217. Energy, Environment and Society (3)

(Also offered as ME 217) A look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use both now and through history. A survey of renewable energy and conservation and their impact on environmental and social systems. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

254. Introduction to Latin American Society I: Social Sciences (3)

(Also offered as POLS 254, SOC 354) Introduction to Latin American Studies through the social sciences examines major themes including colonialism, agrarian transformation, urbanization, demographics, family, human rights, inequalities, violence, and social movements. Emphasis given to insights gained from making interdisciplinary connections.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Geology (GEOL)


1110. Physical Geology (3)

This course is an introduction to our dynamic Earth, introducing students to the materials that make up Earth (rocks and minerals) and the processes that create and modify the features of our planet. The course will help students learn how mountains are formed, how volcanoes erupt, where earthquakes occur, and how water, wind, and ice can shape the landscape. Students will also develop a basic understanding of the ways humans have altered the planet including our impact on natural resources and global climate change. Students are encouraged but not required to enroll concurrently in 1110L. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1110L. Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

Students will learn to identify rocks and minerals in hand samples, work with topographic maps, geologic maps, and geologic cross-sections, and apply stratigraphic principles to explore geologic time. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1110.

1140. Geological Disasters (3)

This course will incorporate an overview of the geological processes that result in natural disasters and the input humans have on the amplification or mitigation of these natural disasters. We will examine past catastrophes and discuss the probability of such disasters occurring again. Hazards investigated will include, but not be limited to earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, hurricanes, floods, landslides, and astronomical events such as meteor and comet collisions with Earth. We will investigate the data obtained from recent disasters and explore the costs in human and economic terms.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110C. Historical Geology Lecture and Laboratory (4)

Origin and history of the Earth including age of the planet and dating of rocks, changing configurations of oceans and continents as a result of plate tectonics, records of climate change, history of formation and erosion of mountain chains, origin and evolution of life and causes of extinction. Required field trip and lab exercises permit understanding of how Earth history is interpreted from the geologic rock record. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: 1110 or ENVS 1130. Pre- or corequisite: 1110L or ENVS 1130L.

2130. Introduction to Meteorology (3)

Introduction to Earth's atmosphere and the dynamic world of weather as it happens. Working with current meteorological data delivered via the Internet and coordinated with learning investigations keyed to the current weather; and via study of select archives.

2140. Geology of New Mexico (3)

This course is a tour of the geologic history and natural places of New Mexico. Students will explore the materials (rocks and minerals) that make up New Mexico and the processes that created and continue to shape our state. Students will learn about mountains, rivers and seas that have come and gone, and New Mexico’s rich fossil heritage. Students will discover where and why volcanoes erupted, and where natural resources are found and extracted.

2430. Volcanoes! (3)

Types of volcanoes and eruption products, role of volcanism in planetary evolution, volcanoes as sources of geothermal energy and mineral deposits, volcanic hazards and disasters, environmental effects of volcanic eruptions. Prerequisite: 1110 or ENVS 1130.

2996. Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)


Women Studies (GNDR)


2110. Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (3)

This course introduces students to key concepts, debates, and analytical tools informing women, gender, and sexuality studies. As an interdisciplinary field of study, women, gender, and sexuality studies employs academic perspectives from a range of disciplines and theoretical approaches. It also incorporates lived experience and social location into its object of analysis. Though content will vary according to the expertise and focus of the instructor, this course will develop tools through readings and assignments that critically analyze how gender and sexuality are shaped by different networks of power and social relations and demonstrate how the intersections of race, class, disability, national status, and other categories identity and difference are central to their understanding and deployment. In addition to feminist though, areas of focus might include gender and sexuality in relation to social, cultural, political, creative, economic, or scientific discourses. This class is recommended for those with a general interest in the topic area as well as for those seeking a foundational course for further study.


General Studies (GNST)


093. General Studies (1-3)

General reading and class discussion in topical areas of interest requested by students or community entities. The course will not duplicate any current departmental offerings.

095. Practicum (3)

195. Practicum II (3)

CCTE Course


German (GRMN)


1110. German I (3)

Intended for students with no previous exposure to German, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills aiming toward the ACTFL novice-mid level. This is an introductory course designed to teach the student to communicate in German in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of German cultures through the identification of cultural products and practices, of cultural perspectives, and the ability to function at a survival level in an authentic cultural content. This course will also develop the student’s sense of personal and social responsibility through the identification of social issues. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. German II (3)

Continuation of 1110. Students will develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first semester, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing German aiming toward the ACTFL novice-high level. This course is designed to increase student fluency in German as applied to everyday situations. Students will also learn to recognize and understand various German products, practices, and perspectives, identifying common cultural patterns, describing basic cultural viewpoints, and further developing their sense of personal and social responsibility through the investigation of cultural issues. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2110. German III (3)

In this third semester course, students will continue to develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first two semesters, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing German aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-low level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in areas of personal interest and in everyday situations. Students will engage in and analyze various German products, practices, and perspectives, as well as continue to develop their sense of personal and social responsibility through comparison and contrast of cultural perspectives. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2120. German IV (3)

In this fourth semester course, students will continue to broaden and refine skills gained during previous semesters, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing German aiming at the ACTFL intermediate-mid level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in situations that go beyond the everyday. Students will evaluate various German products, practices, and create ways to demonstrate their sense of personal and social responsibility through participation in cultural interaction. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2140. Intermediate German Conversation (1-3)

An intermediate German conversation course designed to achieve two primary goals: 1) to provide students of German additional experience speaking and listening, and 2) to offer an overview of current social, cultural and political topics relevant in Germany today. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.


Health Careers Dental Assist (HCDA)


101. Introduction to Dental Assisting (3)

This course will introduce the student to forehanded dentistry to include: asepsis and OSHA recommendations related to general operative procedures, medical history, vital signs, and charting.

120. Dental Assisting Pre-Clinical I (4)

An introduction to forehanded dentistry including aseptic techniques, moisture control, local anesthesia, instrumentation, dental materials and general operative procedures.

125. Dental Assisting Pre-Clinical II (3)

A continuation of Preclinical I with emphasis on forehanded techniques in the six recognized specialties.

130. Dental Radiology (3)

Instruction in the basic principles of radiation physics, and modern intra- and extra-oral dental radiographic techniques. It includes exposing radiographs, arrangement and care of darkroom equipment, composition and preparation of developing solutions, processing and mounting films. Radiation safety and protection guidelines will be emphasized.

140. Dental Education (3)

Various aspects of dental disease prevention will be covered. This will include coronal polishing of teeth, providing one-on-one oral hygiene instruction, the importance of nutrition, and the psychology of patient behavior.

145. Clinical Dental Assisting I (3)

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting.

155. Clinical Dental Assisting II (4)

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting with an emphasis on refinement of chair side skills.

164. Seminar in Dental Assisting Topics (3)

This unit is designed to instruct the student in variety of topics and basic fundamentals in dentistry. It includes both didactic and clinical application of the topic.


Health Careers Health Sciences (HCHS)


101. Phlebotomy (3)

Introduction to the practice of phlebotomy, blood specimen collection, and processing. Content areas consist of: general safety and universal precautions, professionalism and ethics, equipment and supplies, anticoagulants, site selection, vein puncture and capillary puncture techniques, and specimen processing.
Pre/co-requisites: Permission of the Instructor.

111. Medical Terminology (3)

An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes. Fall, Spring, Summer. Also offered as BSTC 181

113. Basic Body Structure & Function I (4)

This is an introductory course in Anatomy and Physiology for students from diverse backgrounds and varying levels of educational preparation. No prior knowledge of biology or chemistry is assumed.

115. Pharmacology for Health Occupations (3)

An introduction to classifications of drugs, usage and contraindications. Spring

123. Human Growth and Development (3)

This course presents theories of biological, cognitive and psychosocial development across the life span. This course will stress the application of concepts to health care.

125. Intro to Pharmacology (3)

This course will present the basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis will be placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic action, adverse reactions, routes of administration and calculation of drug dosages and solutions.

191. Independent Study (1-3)

Designed for study of specific topics, issues and problems in health sciences. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

193. Topics in Health Science (1-9)

Study of specific topics related to the health sciences.

293. Topics II (1-3)

Study of specific topics related to the health sciences. Prerequisite: permission of Department chair.


Health Information Technology (HCHT)


121. Health Information Technology I (4)

An overview of health records services in the United States and the role of the health record practitioner. It introduces the student to the principles and practices of the health records profession.

211. Basic ICD/CPT Coding (4)

An overview of the development of medical nomenclature and classification systems. This course presents the principles of coding of diseases and surgeries, and offers classroom lab practice of coding skills. This is an on-line course. Prerequisite: HCHS 113 and HCHS 111.

213. Principles of Disease (4)

Introduction to human pathophysiology for non-nursing health professionals. Content includes: normal pathophysiology over the lifespan, abnormal pathophysiology, cellular function, immunity, gastrointestinal, nervous, skeletal, and integumentary systems. Prerequisites: HCHS 111 and HCHS 113.

215. Advanced OP Coding (2)

Covers the development and format of CPT and ICD. Included are instructions for basic coding guidelines, descriptions and definitions of symbols, correct usage of modifiers, overviews of the appendices in the CPT manual and guidelines for using the index. Prerequisite: HCHT 211. Use of encoder software will be included.

219. Advanced Inpatient (IP) Coding (3)

Practice assigning ICD-9, ICD-10, and ICD-10 PCS codes using inpatient diagnosis, procedures and reports, using the 3M encode. Prerequisites: HCHT 211

221. Medical-Legal & Quality Management (4)

Study of legal principles governing health information management. The medical record as a legal document. Standards and regulations governing medical records in various groups and agencies. Study of the methods used by healthcare facilities for assuring the provision of high quality medical quality care. Prerequisite: HCHT 121

222. Health Information Technology II (4)

This course covers supervisory principles and electronic medical records, including collection, arrangement, presentation and verification of healthcare data. Also included are reimbursement methodologies, confidentiality rules and regulations, and uses of coded data. Prerequisite is HCHT 121.

231. Computer App/Statistics in Healthcare (4)

This course presents the development of health information systems, computer applications in the healthcare industry, and methods used to control accuracy and security of information. Included are the concepts and procedures used in preparation of statistical reports including vital statistics, census systems and commonly computed rates and percentages. Prerequisite: HCHT 121.

232. Reimbursement Methodologies (3)

This course presents information about insurance programs and federal healthcare legislation. It provides a basic knowledge of claims management, medical necessity and coding systems. Pre/co-requisite: HCHT 211.

233. Professional Practice Experience (6)

In this course the student applies skills, concepts and theory from previous classroom experiences in various healthcare environments. Students are under the direction of faculty and health information preceptors. Pre/co-requisites: satisfactory completion of all HCHT Program Core courses.


History (HIST)


1105. Making History (3, may be repeated once Δ)

General introduction to history: how historians carry out research and develop interpretations about the past.

1110. United States History I (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1120. United States History II (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from reconstruction to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1150. Western Civilization I (3)

This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1160. Western Civilization II (3)

This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1170. Survey of Early Latin America (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times through independence. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1180. Survey of Modern Latin America (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1190. Medieval Europe (3)

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of Medieval Europe. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of specific topics such as the growth of Christianity, feudalism, social conformity, and the responses of the people to the challenges of famine, disease, and warfare. For this purpose, the course is organized chronologically and topically.

1996.. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Survey of New Mexico History (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of New Mexico from the pre-Columbian times to the present day. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of New Mexico within the context of the Americas.

2255. Traditional Eastern Civilizations (3)

This course surveys nearly all of Asia (East, South, and West) from antiquity to approximately 1600 CE. The focus is on the development of three major civilizations: Chinese, South Asian, and Islamic. Topics with comparative potential include governing institutions, social structures, economies and trade, belief systems, and artistic expressions.

2256. Modern Eastern Civilization [Modern Eastern Civilizations] (3)

This course surveys Asia from approximately 1600 CE to the present. Topics include the emergence of modern Asia from the impact of western colonialism and imperialism to nationalism, modernization, and revolution.

2996 [220]. Topics (Studies in History] (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, no limit Δ])


Health Education (HLED)


1113. First Aid and CPR (3)

Preparation in practice to meet needs and situations when basic first aid care is needed. Students eligible for standard first aid certification and CPR Certificate.

1220. Personal Health Management (3)

An introduction to the major areas of information that help humans achieve, maintain, and promote positive health. Topics covered include nutrition, mental and physical health, drugs, human sexuality, prevention and control of diseases and injury, nutrition, and societal and environmental impacts on health.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2130. Consumer Health (1)

Preparation in knowledge and skills related to consumers of health products and services.

2150. Foundations of Health Promotion (3)

For those considering becoming health majors or minors in school health or community health. Exploration of the basic philosophy and fundamental practices currently utilized in health education.

2210. Education for AIDS Prevention (1)

Familiarize yourself concerning the HIV/AIDS epidemic with awareness including basic information, prevention, history, compassion, legal issues, testing, and societal implications.

2530. Fundamentals of Human Sexuality (3)

This course provides an introduction and basic knowledge about human sexuality including anatomical, physiological, psycho-social, and ethical components. Reproduction, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual health and sexual dysfunctions are among areas examined.

2996. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)


Human Services (HMSV)


1110. Group Dynamics (3)

This course introduces you to basic issues and stages of development in the group counseling process; overview of types of counseling groups, group theory, leadership ethical guidelines, group formation and termination. Prerequisite: SOWK 2110.

1120. Interview Techniques (3)

Introduction to entry level interviewing, communication and interactional skills including strengths-based approaches for engagement and problem identification, data collection, assessment, intervention, evaluation and termination of services for diverse populations. Prerequisite: SOWK 2110.

2215. Adolescent Substance Abuse: Prevention and Treatment (3)

Overview of the continuum of care including case management, co- occurring disorders, mandatory reporting issues, family substance abuse, domestic violence and juvenile justice issues. Includes cultural competency treatment implications with diverse populations. Prerequisite: HCHS 140.

2230. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counseling (3)

This course emphasizes the techniques and skills required for counseling with special populations including women, minorities, youth and persons with co-occurring physical and mental disabilities and disorders.

2270. Substance Abuse in Families (3)

This course examines substance abuse within the context of a family system. It includes aspects such as developing a substance abuse family identity, typical problem-solving behaviors in substance-abuse families, daily routine regulators of home life, family ritual disruptions and intergenerational transmission of substance-abuse patterns. Pre- or corequisite: 2230.

2320. Professional Issues in Human Services (3)

Legal and ethical issues emanating from the professional helping relationship in human services, substance abuse treatment, and child welfare such as confidentiality, privileged communication, dual relationships, competency and reciprocal roles of both client and helper. Corequisite: 2998.

2998. Internship (Field Experience) (3)

Application of theories, experience and classroom instruction to an agency setting. Internship requires a total of 150 hours in an approved human services agency and attendance at bi-weekly integrative seminars. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 2320.


Honors (HNRS)


1120 [UHON 121-122]. Honors Legacy Seminar (3, may be repeated twice Δ; 3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Surveys of major ideas basic to the intellectual, historical and artistic traditions of Western culture. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities. Restriction: permission of Honors College.

1120 [UHON 121–122. Honors Legacy Seminar (3, may be repeated twice Δ; 3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Surveys of major ideas basic to the intellectual, historical and artistic traditions of Western culture. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities. Restriction: permission of Honors College.


Information Technology (IT)


101. Computer Fundamentals (1-3)

This course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. The course will prepare the student to utilize computer hardware and software effectively and efficiently. The student is given the opportunity to learn to use electronic mail, explore the web, perform basic file management procedures (copy, rename, create subdirectories, etc.), and edit, format, and print simple documents. The student will also have an opportunity to learn basic information of computer systems to include the functions of various hardware components, the importance of software programs, how information is processed, and the social and ethical implications of the computer generation.


Japanese (JAPN)


1130. Japanese Intensive I (6)

First semester of a two-semester sequence in first year Japanese. This course focuses on the basics of the Japanese language with a balanced approach to the development of four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It is designed to teach students to communicate with Japanese socially and culturally appropriate manners to survive daily life. Basic reading and writing will be also covered in the cultural context. The course follows ACTFL guidelines, integrating the 5 Cs: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities, to offer the student a well- rounded classroom experience. Students will attain ACTFL novice-high level in four skills. Credit for both this course and JAPN 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1135. Japanese Intensive II (6)

Second semester of a two-semester sequence in first year Japanese. This course continues with the basics of the Japanese language with a balanced approach to the development of the four skills; speaking, listening, writing and reading, and cultural enhancement. The course is designed to expand vocabulary, grammar and 145 Kanji to deal with daily activities. This class will be taught by having students interact and perform with each other in addition to the lectures to be given by the instructor in culturally as well as grammatically appropriate manners. Students will attain ACTFL novice- high level in four skills. Credit for both this course and JAPN 1120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1130.

2110. Japanese III (3)

This course is designed for students who have completed 12 credit hours or the equivalent of Japanese study. This course continues to expand vocabulary, grammar and 209 Kanji to deal with daily activities. Its objective is to teach students to communicate in a meaningful way using all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Students will be able to manage not-complicated daily situation. Students will attain ACTFL intermediate-low level in four skills. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1135.

2120. Japanese IV (3)

This course is designed for students who have completed 15 credit hours or the equivalent of Japanese study. This course continues to expand vocabulary, grammar and 271 Kanji to deal with not-complicated daily situation with ease. Also students acquire a competence for Japanese pragmatic usage. This course follows ACTFL language guidelines, integrating the five C’s: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities, to offer the student a well-rounded classroom experience. Students will attain ACTFL intermediate-mid level in four skills. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 2110.


Latin (LATN)


1110. Latin I (3)

Introduction to the Latin language; grammar, syntax and readings in Roman authors. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. Latin II (3)

Continuation of 1110. Introduction to the Latin language; grammar, syntax and readings in Roman authors. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1110.

2110. Latin III (3)

Systematic review of Latin grammar and syntax; readings in simple prose authors such as Cicero and Caesar; introduction to Latin poetry and scansion. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1120.

2120. Latin IV (3)

Systematic review of Latin grammar and syntax; readings in simple prose authors such as Cicero and Caesar; introduction to Latin poetry and scansion. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language. Prerequisite: 1120.


Linguistics (LING)


1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Introduction to the Study of Language and Linguistics (3)

This course presents an introduction to the study of language through the basic aspects of linguistic analysis: the sound system (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax), and the ways in which language is used to convey meaning (semantics and pragmatics). In addition, the course will investigate how language is acquired and stored in the brain, and how differences in speech styles and dialects reflect different social and cultural backgrounds of individual speakers. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated three times Δ])


Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies (LLSS)


1110. Foundations of American Indian Education (3)

This course is an exploration of American Indian education from the past to the present. Topics include: boarding schools, Indigenous language issues, policies, practices, experiences, educational models, language and cultural maintenance, urban/rural schools. In particular, this course will look at curriculum, pedagogy, and the processes of education that empower students to draw on their personal strengths and lived experiences and to develop their confidence in their abilities to learn. We will explore ways to understand and appreciate students’ background, and to foster learning that values the rich cultural and linguistic resources that children bring to the classroom, so that we can help learners successfully integrate the learning community of the school with their broader communities.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Mathematics (MATH)


099. Pre-Algebra (4)

A pre-college mathematics course. Emphasis is placed on basic operations, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and introductory algebra and includes a skills laboratory. Grade option: RCR/RNC.

100. Introduction to Algebra (4)

Topics covered include linear equations, polynomials, factoring, formulas, graphing, and applications problems and include a skills laboratory. Prerequisite/placement: Successful completion of MATH 099. Offered on a RCR/RNC (credit/no credit) basis only.

1118. Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers I (3)

Course offers an in-depth look at rational numbers, arithmetic operations, and basic geometric concepts. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. (T) Prerequisite: 1130 or 1215 or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or FYEX 1010 or ACT Math =>19 or SAT Math Section =>480 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Arithmetic =>276.

1130. Survey of Mathematics (3)

This course will develop students’ ability to work with and interpret numerical data, to apply logical and symbolic analysis to a variety of problems, and/or to model phenomena with mathematical or logical reasoning. Topics include financial mathematics used in everyday life situations, statistics, and optional topics from a wide array of authentic contexts. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: (118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y) or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1440 or 1512 or 1522 or 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>218 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>253.

1215. Intermediate Algebra (3)

A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. Prerequisites/placement: Grade of C or higher in MATH 022 or MATH 100 or minimum ACCUPLACER score of 276-300 (Arithmetic) or ACCUPLACER score of 253-300 (QRAS) or ACCUPLACER score of 228-238 (A&F), or math ACT score of 18-19, or math SAT score of 490-519.

1215X. Intermediate Algebra IA (1)

A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. This is the first course in a three-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed. Prerequisite: (MATH 021 and MATH 022) or MATH 100 or FYEX 1010 or ISM 100 or ACT Math =>17 or SAT Math Section =>460 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =218-238. Corequisite: 1215Y.

1215Y. Intermediate Algebra IB (1)

A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. This is the second course in a three- part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed. Prerequisite: 1215X.

1215Z. Intermediate Algebra IC (1)

A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. This is the third course in a three-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed. Pre- or corequisite: 1215Y.

1220. College Algebra (3)

Note: See Restrictions earlier in Mathematics and Statistics. Preparation for 1240 and 1430. The study of equations, functions and graphs, reviewing linear and quadratic functions, and concentrating on polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills and graphical representation of functions. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: (118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y and 1215Z) or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =239-248.

1230. Trigonometry (3)

A study of plane trigonometry including the definitions of the fundamental trig functions using right angle triangle and unit circle approaches. Trig functions of any real number will be evaluated and the functions graphed along with their transformations. Trigonometric identities will be developed and demonstrated including multiple angle identities and identities developed from them. Inverse trigonometric functions will be developed and used to solve trigonometric equations. Trigonometric applications will be solved using right angle trigonometry and the laws of sines and cosines. Trigonometric methods will be applied to complex numbers and the use of 2D vectors and vector dot products.May be taken concurrently with 1240. (I) Prerequisite: 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.

1240. Pre-Calculus (3)

This course extends students’ knowledge of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions to new contexts, including rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, and sequences and series. May be taken concurrently with 1230. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.

1250. Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus (5)

Includes the study of functions in general with emphasis on the elementary functions: algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Topics include rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, sequences and series, trigonometric equations and identities, complex number, vectors, and applications. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.

1350. . Introduction to Statistics (3)

This course discusses the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will gain introductions to topics such as descriptive statistics, probability and basic probability models used in statistics, sampling and statistical inference, and techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data. These concepts will be illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: (118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y) or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1430 or 1440 or 1512 or 1522 or 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>253.

1430. Applications of Calculus I (3)

An algebraic and graphical study of derivatives and integrals, with an emphasis on applications to business, social science, economics and the sciences. (I) Credit for both this course and MATH 1512 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or ACT Math =>26 or SAT Math Section =>620 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.

1440. Applications of Calculus II (3)

Topics in this course include functions of several variables, techniques of integration, an introduction to basic differential equations, and other applications. (I) Credit for both this course and MATH 1522 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1430.

1512. Calculus I (4)

Limits. Continuity. Derivative: definition, rules, geometric interpretation and as rate-of-change, applications to graphing, linearization and optimization. Integral: definition, fundamental theorem of calculus, substitution, applications such as areas, volumes, work, averages. (I) Credit for both this course and MATH 1430 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: (1230 and 1240) or 1250 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>640 or ACCUPLACER Next- Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>284.

1522. Calculus II (4)

Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, numerical integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series with applications, complex variables, differential equations. (I) Credit for both this course and MATH 1440 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: 1512.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2115. Math for Middle School Teachers (3)

Development of mathematical concepts from the viewpoint of the middle school curriculum. Topics include: in-depth development of algebraic thinking, connections between algebra and geometry, and applications. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: 2118.

2118. Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers III (3)

Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: data analysis and other topics with connections to the elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. (T) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics. Prerequisite: 1118 and (1215X or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or ACT Math =>19 or SAT Math Section =>480 or ACCUPLACER Next- Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>262).

2530. Calculus III (4)

Vector operations, vector representation of planes and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals and Green’s theorem. (I) Prerequisite: 1522.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Management (MGMT)


101. Fundamentals of Accounting I (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. The development of the accounting cycle, special journals and financial statements. Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. degree.

102. Fundamentals of Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: MGMT 101. Continuation of 101, including corporation and manufacturing accounting and decision making. (Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. degree.)

103. Bookkeeping (3)

Designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of principles of bookkeeping and undertake essential bookkeeping and financial record keeping routines for a small business. Prerequisite: READ 100 or Compass-Reading >=71 and ISE 100 and MATH 111.

113. Management: An Introduction (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. Modern concepts of organizations and their management. An overview of functional activities within business and other organizations. Upon demand. (Main Campus Course)

158. Ethics in Organizations (3)

Introduction to ethical issues in business, government, and nonprofit organizations and how to deal with those issues. Emphasis on ethical reasoning and cases of ethical and unethical behavior in management and the professions.

190. Special Topics in Management (3)

Selected offering of management topics not represented in the regular curriculum.

195. Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)

Prerequisites: Read 100 or Compass>=71. ISE 100. Math 118. A survey course that examines topics including: the entrepreneurial process and economy, the entrepreneur's profile and characteristics, youth and social entrepreneurship.

202. Principles of Financial Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: READ 100 or COMPASS ? 71, ISE 100, MATH 118. An examination of the conceptual framework of accounting and the functions of accounting in a business-oriented society. Topics include valuation theory and its applications to assets and liabilities, concepts of business income, funds flow analysis, problems of financial reporting. (Main Campus Course)

222. Introduction to Marketing (3)

A complete overview of the system for assessing customer needs, allocation of scarce resources to fulfill those needs, transmittal of market related information, completion of exchange processes, and profit maximization in free markets. Emphasis on interdisciplinary tools for management, decision making, and developing marketing strategies in domestic and international market applications. Credit not applicable to BBA degree. (Main Campus Course)

290. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)

Prerequisite: Math 180 or equivalent. An overview of the use of statistics in business descriptive statistics and numerical characteristics of data; introduction to probability; statistical inference including t- tests and regression; confidence intervals, applications to business problems will be emphasized. (Main Campus Course)


Marketing (MKTG)


2110. Principles of Marketing (3)

Survey of modern marketing concepts and practices focusing on the marketing mix: product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. Topics include the marketing environment, consumer behavior, marketing research, target marketing, and the ethical and social responsibilities of marketers. Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. Business Administration.


Modern Language (MLNG)


1110. Approaches to Languages and Cultures (3)

An interdisciplinary approach to the interplay of languages and cultures in Europe and Asia. Focus on the role of language in comparative cultural practices and cross-cultural encounters. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1996. Approaches to Languages and Cultures (3)

An interdisciplinary approach to the interplay of languages and cultures in Europe and Asia. Focus on the role of language in comparative cultural practices and cross-cultural encounters. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT)


111. Introduction to Basic Laboratory Skills, Urinalysis, and Body Fluids (4)

An introduction to the profession of medical diagnostic testing and the clinical laboratory. Content areas consist of: general laboratory safety, laboratory mathematics, general instrumentation, use of the microscope, urinalysis, and body fluids. Pre-/co-requisites: Engl 101, Math 119 or 122, and MLT 211 or consent of the instructor. Students are required to co- enroll in MLT 211 – Clinical Hematology and Coagulation. Prerequisite Validation: English and Mathematics competency are essential for the student to master the MLT core curriculum and progress toward the Associate of Science Degree.

112. Clinical Practicum: Phlebotomy (1)

Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience in blood sample collection and processing that includes both Venipuncture and capillary puncture techniques. Pre/co-requisites: HCHS 101 and MLT 111 or permission of instructor.

211. Clinical Hematology and Coagulation (4)

Introduction to the theory and practice of clinical hematology. The course includes: erythropoiesis, leukopoiesis, cell enumeration, the hemogram, white blood cell morphology, differentials, coagulation testing, platelets, routine manual and automated methods, and correlation with pathologies.

214. Clinical Microbiology (5)

Comprehensive current clinical study of bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology; macroscopic and microscopic identification; biochemical identification profiles; bacterial antibiotic susceptibility patterns; parasitic life cycles. Pathology and epidemiology. Introduction to rickettsias and viruses. Prerequisites: MLT 111, 112 and MLT 211.

216. Clinical Chemistry (4)

Theory, principles and procedures applicable to clinical chemistry. Focus on chemical analysis of blood and other body fluids using manual and automated techniques. Application to tests in the diagnosis of disease with review of abnormal physiology. Prerequisites: 111, 214, Math 121.

219. Immunohematology and Serology (4)

Principles, procedures, and pathology for serology. Routine and advanced test procedures to identify and enumerate antibodies. Principles and procedures in Blood Banking. Introduction to genetics. Processing blood components for compatibility testing. Regulation dictated by AABB and FDA. Prerequisites: 111, 214, 216, 217, Math 121. Spring.

271. Directed Clinical Practicum I (4)

Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience includes rotations through urinalysis, hematology, and microbiology. Prerequisites: 111, and 214.

281. Directed Clinical Practicum II (6)

Continuation of MLT 271. Supervised clinical practice in the clinical pathology department of affiliated hospitals. Field laboratory experience includes rotations through blood bank, microbiology, advanced hematology, and serology.

291. Preparation for MLT Board Examinations (2)

Designed to integrate theory with MLT directed clinical practicum. A comprehensive and current review supplemented by reading assignments and questions on the following subjects: sample collection, coagulations, chemistry, microbiology, blood banking, serology, urinalysis, and calculations. Pre-/co- requisites: Students must have completed MLT 111, 112, 211, 214, 216, 219 and be concurrently enrolled in either MLT 271 or MLT 281.


Music (MUSC)


1110. Music Appreciation: Jazz (3)

This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance and is designed to increase the students’ appreciation of music as well as to enhance their listening skills. Students are introduced to various periods, styles, and composers of music and become acquainted with knowledge and appreciation of jazz from various cultures and times. (NM) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1120. Music Appreciation: Rock and Roll (3)

This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance and is designed to increase the students’ appreciation of music as well as to enhance their listening skills. Students are introduced to various periods, styles, and composers of music and become acquainted with knowledge and appreciation of rock and roll music from various cultures and times. (NM) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

1130. Music Appreciation: Western Music (3)

This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance and is designed to increase the students’ appreciation of music as well as to enhance their listening skills. Students are introduced to various periods, styles, and composers of music and become acquainted with knowledge and appreciation of Western music from various cultures and times. (NM) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

1140. Music Appreciation: World Music (3)

This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance and is designed to increase the students’ appreciation of music as well as to enhance their listening skills. Students are introduced to various periods, styles, and composers of music and become acquainted with knowledge and appreciation of World music from various cultures and times.

2410. Music for the Elementary Classroom (3)

An introductory or refresher course for current or future elementary classroom teachers. Musical experiences which relate to all age groups at the elementary level will be covered, including students with special needs.


Native American Studies (NATV)


1150. Introduction to Native American Studies (3)

This course surveys the significance of Native American Studies through an inter-disciplinary approach to two areas of academic concentration: Indigenous Learning Communities, and Leadership and Building Native Nations. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2110. Sociopolitical Concepts in Native America (3)

This course examines a body of politics identified with Native America specific to historical and contemporary relevance for understanding Native American/Indigenous/American Indian nations and communities. Students are challenged to identify issues and debates based on selected readings, films; case examples; and guest presentations to engage in informed discussions about the socio-political experience of Native Americans within the U.S. and indigenous peoples internationally, including ‘global’ activist movements. The course will use a seminar discussion format to present key (theoretical-methodological) approaches to developing a critical understanding of social and political issues impacting Native Americans today. To make the ‘intangible’ i.e., thinking, values, and belief systems but not limited to policies and political behavior, cultural expression that result in tangible actions affecting Native American peoples. Students are expected to develop and refine their skills in articulating verbal and written critiques of sociopolitical concepts identified.

2140. Research Issues in Native America (3)

In this course, you will critically examine research theories, methodologies, and practices of various academic disciplines used to study Native Americans. You will review research databases and collections pertaining to Native Americans. The course focuses on developing your research skills and places an emphasis on the impact and value of research for Native communities. Pre- or corequisite: 1150 or 2110.

255. Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)


Navajo (NAVA)


1110. Navajo I (3)

The purpose of this beginning class is to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to communicate at an elementary level. The course will use a communicative approach for students to learn about the fundamentals of vocabulary, grammar, conversation, and Navajo cultures. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. Navajo II (3)

The purpose of this course is to enhance speaking, reading and writing of Navajo. The course will use a communicative approach for students to learn and utilize more complex vocabulary and grammar for reading, writing, and conversing in the language. Prerequisite: 1110. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1150. Navajo Medical (3)

Using a chart of the human body, students will locate and name the body part in question. In a primary care context, student will say phrases such as ‘breath in’, ‘breath out’, ‘show me where it hurts’, ‘open your mouth’, ‘say aaah’, and so forth. Historical narratives highlight the difference in beliefs of wellness. One such belief is that being fat is not seen as a health concern among some Navajos. Therefore, it’s essential to understand some of the beliefs to help a patient. Does not satisfy language requirement of College of Arts and Sciences. {Offered upon demand}

2110. Intermediate Navajo I (3)

Intermediate Navajo for students who have completed 1120 or equivalent. Introduction to Navajo phonology, morphology, syntax as well as the use of Young and Morgan's 'The Navajo Language'. Emphasis on comprehension and conversation. Prerequisite: 1120. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2120. Intermediate Navajo II (3)

Intermediate Navajo for students who have completed 2110 or equivalent. Continued exploration of Navajo sentence and word structure. Course work will involve extensive reading, writing as well as situational speaking and listening skills. Prerequisite: 2110. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.


Nursing (NMNC)


1110. Introduction to Nursing Concepts (3)

This course introduces the ADN nursing student to the concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning. Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1140L and BIOL 2210 and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215) and (ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1110Y or ENGL 1110Z) and NURS 239 and PSYC 1110 and PSYC 2120. Corequisite: 1135 and BIOL 2225 and NURS 240. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

1135. Principles of Nursing Practice (4)

This course introduces the ADN nursing student to the application of concepts through clinical skills in seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings. Principles of communication, assessments, safety, and interventions including calculation, measurement, and administration of medications. Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1140L and BIOL 2210 and BIOL 2210L and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215) and (ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1110Y or ENGL 1110Z). Corequisite: 1110 and BIOL 2225 and BIOL 2225L and NURS 239. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

1210. Health and Illness Concepts I (3)

This course will focus on health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, sexuality/reproduction, protection/movement, and emotional processes. Prerequisite: 1110 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 1220 and 1235 and NURS 240 and HCHS 125. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

1220. Health Care Participant (3)

This course introduces the nursing student to the attributes of the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. Prerequisite: 1110 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 1210 and 1235 and HCHS 125 and NURS 240. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

1230. Nursing Pharmacology (3)

This course introduces the nursing student to pharmacologic nursing practice from a conceptual approach. Prerequisite: 1110 and 1135 and NURS 240.

1235. Assessment and Health Promotion (4)

This course introduces the nursing student to the assessment of and the health promotion for the health care participant as an individual, family, or community. This course uses seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings. Prerequisite: 1110 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 1210 and 1220 and HCHS 125 and NURS 240. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2310. Health and Illness Concepts II (3)

This course will cover health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to oxygenation and hemostasis, homeostasis and regulation, protection and movement, and cognitive and behavioral processes. Prerequisite: 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and NURS 239 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 2320 and 2335. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2320. Professional Nursing Concepts I (3)

This course covers foundational concepts for professional development, including selected professional attributes and care competencies. Prerequisite: 1210 and 1220 and 1235. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2335. Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions (4)

The focus of this course is to provide safe, evidence-based nursing care for patients with chronic conditions, across the lifespan in a variety of settings. This course is a combination of lab and clinical. Prerequisite: 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and NURS 239 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 2310 and NURS 290. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2410. Health and Illness Concepts III (4)

This course will cover health and illness concepts, with the focus on acute conditions across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, oxygenation/hemostasis, protection/movement, and emotional processes. Prerequisite: 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and 2310 and 2320 and 2335 and NURS 239 and NURS 240 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 2435 and 2445. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2435. Clinical Intensive I (4)

In this course students will apply the curricular concepts in the management of care to health care participants with acute conditions across the lifespan. This course is a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical. Prerequisite: 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and 2310 and 2320 and 2335 and NURS 239 and NURS 240 and NURS 240L. Corequisite: 2410. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.

2445. AND Capstone (2)

This clinical course provides assessment of the student's nursing knowledge, skills, and abilities in preparation for graduation while the student works with a preceptor RN in the acute, long-term, or community setting. Prerequisite: NURS 222L and NURS 252 and NURS 291. Corequisite: NURS 253 and NURS 258L. Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.


Natural Science (NTSC)


1110. Physical Science for Teachers (4)

Introduces the science of geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy, with emphasis on the sciences processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. This course is activity based utilizing problems and issues based approach. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1120. Life Science for Teachers (4)

Uses activities for the study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

2110. Environmental Science for Teachers (4)

Introduces major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science processes, scientific investigations and field-based activities, and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems, and natural resources. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.


Nursing (NURS)


239. Pathophysiology I (3)

An introduction to human pathophysiology. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: none

240. Pathophysiology II (3)

This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students. Prerequisites: none.


Nutrition (NUTR)


1110. Nutrition for Health (3)

This course provides an overview of general concepts of nutrition, which can be applied to food choices that support a healthy lifestyle. The cultural, psychological, physiological and economic implications of food choices are explored.

2110. Human Nutrition (3)

This course provides an overview of nutrients, including requirements, digestion, absorption, transport, function in the body and food sources. Dietary guidelines intended to promote long-term health are stressed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C or CHEM 1120C or (CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L).


Physical Education Non-Professional Program (See also: PHED) (PENP)


108. Classical Jujutsu I (Beginner-Intermediate) (1-2, no limit Δ)

Jujutsu, the art of the samurai, helps develop defensive and offensive combat skills, inner power, self discipline, harmony and control.

109. Classical Jujutsu II (Intermediate-Advanced) ((1-2, no limit Δ)

Jujutsu II helps develop intermediate to advanced level defensive and offensive combat skills and higher levels of control, power, focus and personal harmony.

111. Military Fitness (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice of various techniques used by various branches of the military to enhance fitness.


Physical Education (Non-Professional) (See also: PENP) (PHED)


1110. Topics in Dance (1-2, no limit Δ)

1210. Basketball: Competition (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice of game skills in a team setting.

1230. Topics in Individual Sport (1-2, no limit Δ)

1280. Topics in Volleyball ((1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice of basic game skills, with emphasis upon power techniques.

1310. Swim I: Beginning Swimming (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction for students who have not been in the water or have a fear of water.

1320. Aqua Fit: Water Polo (1-2, no limit Δ)

Basic skills, strategy, rules and terminology to play and officiate the game.

1410. Yoga: Beginning Yoga (1-2, no limit Δ)

Introduction to five areas of yoga which are particularly significant to the Western World.

1420. Topics in Stretching and Relaxation (1, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice of various techniques to enhance flexibility and reduce stress.

1430. Pilates (1, no limit Δ)

Instruction in movements that increase balance, core fitness and cardiorespiratory endurance.

1440. Tai Chi (1, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice in techniques to enhance body awareness, reduces stress, improve balance and increase strength.

1510. Training: Resistance Training (1, no limit Δ)

Individual training programs for development of general strength, tone, endurance and weight control. Fitness Test fee.

1620. Topics in Fitness (1-2, no limit Δ)

1710. Topics in Martial Arts (1-2, no limit Δ)

1830. Topics in Running (1-2, no limit Δ)

1910. Topics in Outdoor Experience (1-2, no limit Δ)

2110. Topics in Dance II (1-2, no limit Δ)

2230. Topics in Individual Sport II (1-2, no limit Δ)

2310. Swim II: Intermediate Swimming (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction in all basic strokes. For students who can swim.

2320. Aqua Fit II: Advanced Swimming and Conditioning (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction and practice in perfecting all swimming strokes; competitive skills; synchronized skills.

2410. Yoga II: Intermediate Yoga (1-2, no limit Δ)

Instruction in more advanced techniques of Yoga emphasizing the physical aspects of Hatha Yoga.

2510. Training II: Intermediate Weight Training (1, no limit Δ)

Instruction in advanced weight-lifting principles and techniques as well as fitness related topics. Fitness Test fee.

2710. Topics in Martial Arts II (1-2, no limit Δ)

2996. Topics [Topics in Physical Education] (1-6, no limit Δ [1-2, no limit Δ])


Philosophy (PHIL)


1115. Introduction to Philosophy (3)

In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1120. Logic, Reasoning, and Critical Thinking (3)

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2140. Professional Ethics (3)

This course focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in the context of professional life. Beginning with an overview of several major ethical theories, the course will consider how these theories, which traditionally concern personal morality, apply to life in a professional setting. The course will focus on issues that might include lying and truth-telling, whistleblowing, confidentiality, the obligations of businesses toward the public, and the ethical concerns of privacy in journalism. Using a combination of readings, case studies, and discussion, students will explore these issues by critically evaluating ethical principles and also applying them to real-world settings. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2210. Early Modern Philosophy (3)

This course is an introductory survey of early modern Western philosophy. Through an in-depth reading of primary source material, this course will examine the traditions of Rationalism and Empiricism that emerged during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Concepts to be discussed might include theories of knowledge and metaphysics, early modern scientific thought, and theories of the self. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2220. Greek Philosophy (3)

This course is an introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy. The course will include discussion of such philosophers as the Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Topics to be discussed may include the beginnings of scientific thought, theories of the self, the concept of being, virtue ethics, happiness, and theories of justice. (I)

2225. Greek Thought (3)

An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides. (I) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2240. Introduction to Existentialism (3)

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the tradition of existential philosophy through a careful reading of philosophical texts by authors, such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Heidegger. (I)

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ])


Physics (PHYC)


1110. Physics and Society (3)

If you are curious about how common things work, about physics that is relevant to social and political issues, or just about the natural world in general, this is just the course for you! No previous background in physics or mathematics (beyond high school algebra) is required or expected. Just bring a lively curiosity and a dedication to learning new things. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1115. Survey of Physics (3)

Overview of the concepts and basic phenomena of physics. This course provides a largely descriptive and qualitative treatment with a minimum use of elementary mathematics to solve problems. No previous knowledge of physics is assumed. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

1115L. Survey of Physics Laboratory (1)

A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1115. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1115.

1120. Introduction to Applied Physics (3)

This course is designed for students who need more experience with force and motion before tackling 1230 or 1310. It also serves as a good refresher for students who let some time lapse between taking Physics I and II.

1125. Physics of Music (3)

Introduction for non-science majors to basic concepts, laws, and skills in physics, in the context of a study of sound, acoustics, and music.

1125L. Physics of Music Laboratory (1)

Experiments to accompany 1125. Two hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 1125.

1230. Algebra-Based Physics I (3)

An algebra-based treatment of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, and fluids. The sequence (PHYS 1230, 1230L, 1240, 1240L) is required of pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-optometry students. Only 1230 and 1240 are required of pharmacy students. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1310 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>660 or ACCUPLACER Next- Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>284.

1230L. Algebra-Based Physics I Laboratory (1)

A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1230. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1230.

1231. Problems in Algebra-Based Physics I (1)

This is a supplemental course for 1230. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 1230.

1240. Algebra-Based Physics II (3)

The second half of a two semester algebra-based introduction to physics. This course covers electricity, magnetism and optics. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1320 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: 1230.

1240L. Algebra-Based Physics II Laboratory (1)

A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1240. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1240.

1241. Problems in Algebra-Based Physics II (1)

This is a supplemental course for 1240. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 1240.

1310. Calculus-Based Physics I (3)

A calculus-level treatment of classical mechanics and waves, which is concerned with the physical motion concepts, forces, energy concepts, momentum, rotational motion, angular momentum, gravity, and static equilibrium. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1230 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1512.

1310L. Calculus-Based Physics I Laboratory (1)

A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1310. Students will apply the principles and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in coursework for 1310. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1310.

1311. Problems in Calculus-Based Physics I (1)

This is a supplemental course for 1310. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 1310.

1320. Calculus-Based Physics II (3)

A calculus-level treatment of classical electricity and magnetism. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as 1320L. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1240 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Prerequisite: 1310. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1522.

1320L. Calculus-Based Physics II Laboratory (1)

A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1320. Students will apply the principles and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in coursework for 1320. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Pre- or corequisite: 1320.

1321. Problems in Calculus-Based Physics II (1)

This is a supplemental course for 1320. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 1320.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2310. Calculus-Based Physics III (3)

This course, the third in the calculus based sequence for science and engineering students, is a study of optics and topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: 1320. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 2530.

2310L. Calculus-Based Physics III Laboratory (1)

Covers topics in geometrical optics, wave optics and modern physics at the calculus level. Lab activities mirror and enhance lecture topics. Hands-on experiments involving data collection and analysis give students a better conceptual framework for understanding physics. Geometrical and wave optical phenomena are deeply probed. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2310.

2311. Problems in Calculus-Based Physics III (1)

Problem solving and demonstrations related to 2310. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 2310.

2415. Computational Physics (3)

This class is designed as an introduction to programming for the undergraduate physics major. The class begins with no assumption of prior programming experience. An emphasis will be on building strong programming skills using the MATLAB programming environment. Applications and examples will include data analysis (curve fitting and optimization), simulating physical systems, solving systems of linear equations and Monte Carlo techniques. Prerequisite: 2310. Pre- or corequisite: MATH **316.

2996. Topics [Selected Topics] (1-6, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated three times Δ])


Political Science (POLS)


1120. American National Government (3)

This course explains the role of American national government, its formation and principles of the Constitution; relation of state to the national government; political parties and their relationship to interest groups. This course also explains the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. (C) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1140. The Political World (3)

This course introduces politics with emphasis on the ways people can understand their own political systems and those of others in a greater depth. This course will help in becoming more responsible and effective in the political world. (I) Students who have already had courses in political science may not count this course toward a major. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Comparative Politics (3)

This course introduces comparative politics by examining the political history, social and economic structures, and contemporary political institutions and behavior, with focus on occurrences in countries representing diverse cultures, geographies, and levels of development. (C) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2120. International Relations (3)

This course covers the analysis of significant factors in world politics, including nationalism, national interest, political economy, ideology, international conflict and collaboration, balance of power, deterrence, international law, and international organization. (C) Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2130. Political Ideas: Introduction to Political Theory (3)

This course offers an introductory survey of political theory. Emphasis is placed on (1) textual analysis of primary sources and on (2) scholarly analysis of the foundational questions and methods central to the academic study of political ideas. Studying political ideas involves thinking about a) the very definition of political theory itself, b) what one would need to know in order to make evidence- based claims about political theory texts and c) why and how the study of political theory leads political scientists into the exploration of “essentially contested concepts.” More specifically, throughout the semester, we will explore questions relating to 1) what is the definition of political theory; 2) why/how are interpretative disputes at the core of political theory and 3) how have major political theories/ideas—democracy, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, liberation theory, and fascism—changed and developed over time? In sum, this is a survey course on the history of political ideas.

2140. Introduction to Political Analysis (3)

What makes the field of political science a science? What are the variety of research methods and tools for analysis employed by scholars? The goal of this course is to introduce students to the scientific process by political scientists. The interpretation and analysis of data is also essential for almost any career that a political science major might pursue. Lawyers and lobbyists, politicians and professors all need to be able to read and understand reports in which numerical summaries of data (i.e., statistics) are used as evidence to support an argument or point of view. These professionals need to ascertain whether these statistics are being used appropriately. In addition, many of these professionals need to do their own statistical analysis. This course introduces students to statistics and the scientific study of politics. Students will learn why statistics are useful, how to interpret a variety of statistics, how to analyze data to generate their own statistics, and how to tell whether their statistics support their own argument. Students will also learn how to apply the scientific research process to their own research questions by completing a research design project.

2150. Public Policy and Administration (3)

The objective of this introductory course in public policy and public administration is to provide students with a basic understanding of the ways that government deals with problems affecting society. We will explore the political tools used to address public policy problems, as well as the political environment in which public policies are formed. Additionally, several specific public policy problems will be discussed during the semester. For each topic, we will try to understand the goals that the government and society seem to be seeking, alternative means for achieving those goals, the costs and benefits of the various alternatives, and the impact of politics on those goals. We will primarily examine policymaking at the national level, but we will also look at some examples at the state and local level.

254. Introduction to Latin American Society I: Social Sciences (3)

(Also offered as GEOG 254, SOC 354) Introduction to Latin American Studies through the social sciences examines major themes including colonialism, agrarian transformation, urbanization, demographics, family, human rights, inequalities, violence, and social movements. Emphasis given to insights gained from making interdisciplinary connections.

291. Internship (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Provides supervised work experience in the practical application of political science skills. POLS major or minor students are limited to no more than 3 credit hours. Additional or excess credit hours above these limits may be counted as Arts and Sciences electives. (I) Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor and department chairperson.

2996. Topics (3, no limit Δ)

Political Science major or minor students are limited to no more than 3 credit hours. Additional or excess credit hours above these limits may be counted as Arts and Sciences electives.


Psychology (See also: PSY) (PSYC)


1110. Introduction to Psychology (3)

This course will introduce students to the concepts, theories, significant findings, methodologies, and terminology that apply to the field of psychology. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2110. Social Psychology (3)

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human social influence and interaction, and explores how an individual’s actions, emotions, attitudes and thought processes are influenced by society and other individuals. Prerequisite: 1110

2120. Developmental Psychology (3)

Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from a lifespan development perspective. Prerequisite: 1110.

2220. Cognitive Psychology (3)

The course provides an overview of human cognitive processes such as attention, perception, memory, language, categorization, decision-making, reasoning, and problem solving. Includes methods, theories, and applications. Prerequisite: 1110.

2250. Brain and Behavior (3)

A general survey of the biological foundations of behavior and mental processes. Students will gain an understanding of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system and their relationships to human behavior. Prerequisite: 1110 or BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1140.

2270. Psychology of Learning and Memory (3)

This course provides an overview of how information is acquired, stored, retrieved, and manifested in the behavior of human and non-human animals. Prerequisite: 1110.

2320. Health Psychology (3)

This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact with and affect different areas within health. Course will cover the role of stress in illness, coping with illness, pain management, and the role of health behavior in health and disease. Prerequisite: 1110.

2330. Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)

Exploration of the psychological, physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles, and sex identity. Prerequisite: 1110.

2510. Statistical Principles for Psychology (3)

This course covers introductory-level topics in statistics that are applicable to psychological research. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered. Topics include applying statistical formulas to psychological data and interpreting the results of statistical analyses. Prerequisite: 1110.

2996. Topics [Special Topics] (1-6, no limit Δ [1-3, no limit Δ])


Religion (RELG)


1110. Introduction to World Religions (3)

This course introduces major world religions and the scholarly methods of the academic study of religion. Religions covered may include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and/or New Religious Movements. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

1120. Introduction to the Bible (3)

An introductory study of the structure and content of the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. This class provides the context and reading skills for study and investigation of the Bible and its influence upon western culture and religion.

1123. Hebrew Bible (3)

An introduction to the history, beliefs, practices, and development of the Hebrew and later Jewish religion as reflected in the Hebrew Biblical Scriptures, using a historical and critical approach, with attention given to understanding its socio-cultural and political environment.

1126. New Testament (3)

An introduction to the history, beliefs, practices, and development of the early Christian religion as reflected in the New Testament, using a historical and critical approach, with attention given to understanding its socio- cultural and political environment.

1550. Religion, Health and Medicine (3)

Introduces students to how people’s religious beliefs and practices influence their perspectives on health and their approaches to medical care and treatment. In units arranged by religion or region (North American indigenous religion, African religion, Hinduism, Chinese religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), students will learn how religious beliefs and practices relate to rites of passage, sexuality, women’s health, diet, mental health, trauma, and end of life issues. In addition to assessing students’ knowledge of the relationship between religion and perspectives on health and medical care and treatment, course assignments will raise students awareness of how people with different worldviews interact. Course requirements or activities also will teach them how to evaluate their own biases and how to assess the biases and credibility of various sources of information about religion, health, and medicine found on the Internet and elsewhere.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Eastern Religions (3)

Provides an academic overview of the major religious traditions of Asia, which may include the religions of India (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, China (Daoism and Confucianism, Chan Buddhism), and Japan (Shinto and Zen Buddhism). Students will be assigned both primary and secondary texts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2120. Western Religions (3)

This is a survey course that will cover major religious traditions of the West, including the three Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and other religious systems. The course will focus on how each tradition has developed historically and how it exists in the world today. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Signed Language Interpreting (SIGN)


2125. Introduction to Signed Language (3)

An introductory level language course in the language of the American Deaf Culture. Content includes ASL vocabulary and conversational skills; linguistic features of ASL; and skills in narrative/storytelling. In‐class activities, comprehension and expressive examinations, narrative and storytelling assignments in addition to semester projects are venues for students to demonstrate their learning. In addition, Deaf Culture and Deaf Community issues are addressed.


Sociology (SOCI)


1110. Introduction to Sociology (3)

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories of sociology, as well as to the methods utilized in sociological research. The course will address how sociological concepts and theories can be utilized to analyze and interpret our social world, and how profoundly our society and the groups to which students belong influence them. Students will be given the opportunity to challenge their “taken for granted” or “common sense” understandings about society, social institutions, and social issues. Special attention will also be paid to the intimate connections between their personal lives and the larger structural features of social life. In addition, the implications of social inequalities, such as race/ethnicity, gender, and social class will be central to the course’s examination of social life in the United States. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2120. Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (3)

This course provides an introduction to social issues that are currently affecting the criminal justice system in the United States. The course will cover the history of the U.S. criminal justice system and how our system compares with other countries. We will address how the U.S. criminal justice system attempts to create and preserve a balance between sustaining order, maintaining individual rights, and promoting justice. Important themes also include, but are not limited to discussions of how crime and delinquency are measured, key correlates of crime, sociological approaches to researching crime, sociological theories of crime, the quality of crime data in the U.S. and how it is used to make public policy decisions, and the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the United States. Prerequisite: 1110.

2210. Sociology of Deviance (3)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the study of deviance and social control from multiple sociological perspectives. The instructor will present how sociologists research deviance and social control and the ethical issues involved in studying human subjects involved in these activities. The course also examines central sociological theories for understanding the causes of deviant behavior. Prerequisite: 1110.

2310. Contemporary Social Problems (3)

This course studies the nature, scope, and effects of social problems and their solutions. The course will concentrate on sociological perspectives, theories, and key concepts when investigating problems, such as inequality, poverty, racism, alienation, family life, sexuality, gender, urbanization, work, aging, crime, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and mass media. This course is designed to build students’ sociological understanding of how sociological approaches attempt to clarify various issues confronting contemporary life, as well as how sociologists view solutions to these problems. Prerequisite: 1110.

2315. The Dynamics of Prejudice (3)

This course is designed to help students understand how attitudes and beliefs of individuals shape intergroup relations and their impacts on the daily lives of individuals as well as the effects that these beliefs have on the larger social structure of American society. We will examine how profoundly our society and the groups to which we belong, influence us and our beliefs and ultimately how these beliefs shape prejudice in our society. In this course, students are encouraged to challenge ideologies that are considered "common sense" or that are taken for granted and this in turn will allow them to critically engage issues in society such as racism, classism, sexism, and will leave with an understanding on how privilege affects our views on disability, LGBTQ issues, religion and immigration. Rather than investigating these themes in the abstract, students will identify and unpack how these larger structural issues play integral roles in their everyday lives, interactions, and existence. Ultimately, this course aims to address the social inequalities that exists in our society as a result of prejudice and will challenge students to identify and engage in strategies to work towards changing these aspects of society. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

2340. Global Issues (3)

Many of the problems we face on a daily basis are global in scope and global in origin. The world is now more interconnected than ever. The things that happen in China or in Saudi Arabia affect us in the United States, just as the things that we do here affect the people in Russia or Egypt. This course offers a sociological perspective on this phenomenon of globalization and explores its origins in the culture of capitalism. To this end, we will examine topics such as consumption, labor, migration and immigration, economic inequality, the natural environment, and health. We will also consider various ways in which these problems can, or cannot, be solved for us and for future generations. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences. Prerequisite: 1110.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Social Work (SOWK)


1110. Ethics for Social Work and Human Services (3)

This course introduces students new to social work or human services to ethical standards and practices. The course includes ethics concepts including confidentiality, client rights, duty to warn, communication ethics, and applied ethics. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics serves as the foundation of the course.

2110. Introduction to Human Services and Social Work (3)

This course is for students who are interested in social welfare issues and/or are considering entering a social service profession. The course presents an overview of social problems, issues and trends, and the network of social agencies developed to address these concerns. The course examines the influence of personal and professional values and ethics on the helping relationship. The concept of social welfare will be discussed from a social work perspective (with an emphasis on social justice), and students will gain a basic understanding of social work in U.S. society, social work career opportunities, and contemporary issues facing social workers. Approaches relevant to work with individuals, families, groups and communities are presented, with special emphasis on Hispanic and Indigenous populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.


Spanish (SPAN)


1110. Spanish I (3)

Designed for students with little exposure to Spanish, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. During this course, students perform better and stronger in the Novice-Mid level while some abilities emerge in the Novice High range. This is an introductory course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish in everyday familiar situations via recognition and production of practiced or memorized words, phrases, and simple sentences. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1120. Spanish II (3)

Designed for students with some degree of exposure to Spanish in high school and/or at home, this course continues to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines, although a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate Low Level. Students in this course communicate in Spanish in familiar topics using a variety of words, phrases, simple sentences and questions that have been highly practiced and memorized. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1125. Conversational Spanish I (1)

This third-semester Spanish course emphasizes oral communication, idiomatic usage and the development of vocabulary, with a review of basic syntax. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Pre- or corequisite: 1110 or 1120 or 1210 or 1220.

1210. Spanish for Heritage Learners I (3)

This is a beginning-level Spanish course designed for students who have a cultural connection to the Spanish language. Some students have had very little exposure to the language and enter the class to develop beginning- level skills. Other students may have grown up hearing the heritage language in the community and may understand some Spanish and speak at a basic level as a result. The objective is to draw upon the connection to the heritage language as a source of motivation and engagement for our learning communities. At the same time, we build upon the language base that students may already have as a result of their heritage learner experience in order to develop new proficiencies in Spanish and reactivate the Spanish that students have learned previously. By the end of this course, students will be able to describe their home, campus surroundings and common activities including cultural traditions. At the same time, students gain cultural competency and develop a critical understanding of their linguistic and cultural background.

1220. Spanish for Heritage Learners II (3)

A second semester class designed for students who have developed some basic Spanish proficiency from previous classes and/or from community experiences. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Class activities are designed to strengthen oral communication skills (speaking and listening) through a variety of group activities. By the end of the course students will be able to understand and produce narrations of past events in oral and written Spanish. In order to foster a desire to revitalize and maintain the Spanish language in the US context we attempt to raise students’ critical awareness of what it means to be part of a specific speech community. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

1996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)

2110. Spanish III (3)

This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). This is an intermediate course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish on familiar topics about self, others and everyday life at the same time that they recognize and handle short social interactions in interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2120. Spanish IV (3)

This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Intermediate High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). This is an intermediate course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish on familiar topics about self, others and everyday life at the same time that they recognize and handle short social interactions in interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2125. Conversational Spanish II (3)

A conversational Spanish course designed for the "intermediate" level student. The course provides intensive conversation practice and a review of selected grammar items. It emphasizes vocabulary expansion and enhancement. (L) Pre- or corequisite: 2110 or 2120 or 2210 or 2220.

2210. Spanish for Heritage Learners III (3)

A third semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, some Spanish as a result of hearing it in the home, and in the community by family, friends, and neighbors. Students in this course will continue to develop their ability to narrate events in the past and will be able to describe hypothetical situations. Students will also develop their ability to express wishes, desires, and necessities. This course will help the student build confidence in their Spanish abilities and expand the language use in the areas of writing, reading, oral production and listening comprehension. In order to foster a desire to revitalize and maintain the Spanish language we attempt to raise students’ critical awareness of wider issues facing Spanish speakers in the US context.

2220. Spanish for Heritage Learners IV (3)

A fourth-semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, Spanish as a result of having heard it in the home and in the community. It is also for students with a cultural connection to heritage language speech communities or who have achieved proficiency from study in previous courses. This course will help the student build confidence in their Spanish abilities and expand the language use in the areas of writing, reading, oral production and listening comprehension. In addition to scaffolding skills that students already have, in this class they will expand their ability to describe abstract and hypothetical situations. Students will write essays, reaction papers, and creative pieces. Students will also examine formal and informal contexts of language use in speaking and writing. By studying the cultural and historical background shared by students as part of the program, students will develop an increased critical awareness of Spanish language speech communities. (L) Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2420. Introduction to Medical Spanish (3)

This class has been designed specifically for those entering or already practicing in the medical field. The purpose of the class is to have each student become compliant with the Spanish language federal requirement in order to function better at the bedside with Spanish-speaking patients with little or no English abilities. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

2996. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)


Special Education (See also: SPCD) (SPED)


2110. Introduction to Students with Exceptionalities (2)

This course is an introduction to special education with information regarding characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities, special education terminology, evidence-based instructional strategies, diversity of students with exceptional needs, relationships between personal and cultural perspectives, and legal policies pertaining to exceptional students’ rights.


Sustainability Studies (SUST)


1134. Introduction to Sustainability Studies (3)

This course provides a broad survey of various aspects of sustainability. Students will explore topics such as climate change, renewable energy, water, agriculture, green building, socially responsible business, micro lending, environmental justice, smart growth and alternative progress indicators. Students will examine both contemporary challenges to sustainable development and examples of successful sustainability initiatives on local, national, and global levels.


Theatre (THEA)


1110. Introduction to Theatre (3)

This course provides an introduction to the study of theatre. Students will examine various components that comprise theatre, such as acting, directing, playwriting, dramaturgy, scenic and costume design, stagecraft, spectatorship, history, theory, and criticism. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.


University (UNIV)


102. Topics: Academic Foundations (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Designed to engage students who share academic interests, with their intended major, college or school.

201. Topics in Career Exploration (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Both general and discipline-specific sections offered. Students will explore their goals, passions, and skills, and the steps and tools related to career decision-making (general seminar). In the discipline-specific sections, students will explore specific career options.


Welding Technology (WLDT)


101. Welding Blueprint Reading (4)

Introductory course on welding blueprint reading and related theory. Students demonstrate competency by satisfactory completion of instructional modules and American Welding Society Standards.

104. NCCER Core (4)

Required introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for certification. Topics studied include basic math, communications, prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

105. Arc Welding I (4)

This course will introduce the student to the process of electrode manipulation, position welding and use of the different welding machines.

106. Arc Welding II (4)

Introduction to the practices of open root welds in metals of various thickness of the butt and V-Bevel type in the four basic positions using several types of electrodes. Prepares and enables a welder to take a test for the shop building industry. Tested from the American Welding Society Code 5.19 for groove thickness qualification.

107. Advanced Arc Welding (4)

Directed to achieving high quality S.M.A.W. welds, which conforms to specific codes and procedures. Competency in this course is encouraged before attempting pipe classes. Course will introduce American Welding Society D5.0 welding qualification codes. Prerequisite: 104*, 105*, 106*.

108. Oxyfuel Welding I (4)

This course will introduce the student to gas welding process. The student will learn to handle and use the acetylene gas form of welding.

112. Gas Metal Arc Welding (3)

GMAW and FCAW General safety procedures. Equipment setup and use GMAW and FCAW. Select and use different filler metal and shield gas. Make multiple-pass filler and V-Groove welds on carbon steel plate in various positions.

120. General Welding Applications (4)

Preparation and setup of arc welding equipment. Process of striking an arc and making stringer beads, weave, overlapping beads and filler metal. Visually detect and correct arc blow.

130. Pipe Welding (4)

Utilizes advanced Arc and oxyacetylene welding skills and techniques on ferrous pipe in a rotating and/or a fixed position. Emphasis is placed on the open groove pipe joint. Course will include alignment techniques, oxyacetylene cutting of pipe, pre-heat interpass temperatures, and mechanical preparation of the joints. Spring. oxyacetylene and tempering and hardening steel and its alloys are also taught. Spring.

141. M.l.G. and T.l.G. Welding (4)

Arc Welding Course designed to further the knowledge and skills of welders. The course begins with a short review of pipe welding and groove welds on plate in all positions and covers stainless steel, cupro nickel alloys, hard facing processes, gas metal arc welding or M.l.G. and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding or T.l.G. Advanced uses for oxyacetylene and tempering and hardening steel and its alloys are also taught. Spring.

201. Welding Metallurgy, Math and Communication (4)

Second part of core curriculum component. Students will study Metallurgy, Math and Communication skills for welding technology.

205. Arc Welding II (3)

Groove welding and how to set up equipment. Making groove welds and groove welding with backing. Provide procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical, and overheard groove welding. Pre-requisite: WLDT 105

212. Gas Metal Arc Welding II (4)

Set-up pipe beveler with oxy-fuel with safety precautions. Perform cutting on pipe with pipe beveler and free on pipe. Fit pipe to standers and perform welds downhill with GMAW. Pre-requisite: WLDT 112

230. Pipe Welding II (3)

Gas tungsten arc welding 2- and 6-inch pipe schedule 80 in all positions. Using GTAW to deposit the root and second past SMAW to complete the weld. Pre-requisite: WLDT 130

241. MIG and TIG Welding II (3)

Learn fundamentals of GTAW (TIG) for steel stainless steel and aluminum. Welding procedures edge, corner, lap and filler weld in all positions. Procedures taught on aluminum and stainless steel. Pre- requisite: WLDT 141

251. Layout and Fabrication (3)

First course in layout and fabrication. Stresses layout symbols, lines/fabrication, shop procedure and machine. How to lay out and build using basic concepts of plumb, level and square. Anatomy and how to apply circles and curves.

295. Welding Practicum (3-9 ∆)

A planned program of study and activity designed to give the student practical experience which involves student responsibilities and uses student knowledge and skills to provide an advanced learning experience. Arranged.

299. Cooperative Education in Welding Technology (3-6)

The student will work in a training facility in the Gallup area and, at the same time, will be attending the college during part of the day. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.